The AFP Greater Toronto Chapter is a recognized leader in promoting philanthropy and providing education, training and best practices for those in the fundraising profession. With more than 1200 members, the Greater Toronto Chapter is the largest of the more than 240 AFP chapters throughout the world.

 

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National Philanthropy Day® is a special day set aside on the fifteenth of November. The purpose of this day is to recognize the great contributions of philanthropy—and those people active in the philanthropic community—to the enrichment of our world.

NPD was originally conceived of and organized by Douglas Freeman in the 1980s, and the first official events held in 1986 after President Reagan signed the official NPD proclamation. The day provides an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of giving and all that it has made possible. NPD celebrates the endless daily contributions individuals and organizations across the world make to countless causes and missions.

Last year, more than 130 AFP chapters held NPD events and activities across North America. In addition, AFP launched #NPDLove, a global social media outreach and awareness campaign to engage the global charitable sector, the philanthropic community, and the public in activities to demonstrate “love of humankind” and highlight how they (or their organization) are helping to change the world.

Stay tuned for more details about NPD 2018 coming soon!

 

 

 

Latest Blog Entries View All

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Congress, Mentorship, Networking, Next Generation Philanthropy, Opinion, Special Events.

With Congress a little over a month away and the latest AFP Speaker Discovery Series (Special Pre-Congress Edition!) just around the corner, let’s talk speaking!

 

Every industry has speakers who are a staple within the events circuit, familiar figures on the conference stage; but what happens when the industry changes? Or those speakers start to retire? This year has seen a number of speakers new to the non-profit world or, in fact, new to speaking altogether take the stage – and this is in no small part due to the launch of the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter’s Speaker Discovery Series (SDS).

 

Recently, Laura Champion, Chair of the Education Committee for Congress 2018 and Founder and Chair of the AFP Speaker Discovery Series, sat down with Mo Waja, one of our Congress 2018 Speakers, on the Let’s Talk Speaking podcast to discuss what speaking looks like in the non-profit sector, discovering new speaking talent, and how organizations within and beyond the non-profit industry can begin building their next generation of speakers.

 

Check out the episode below as well as on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher, and don’t forget to buy your tickets for the next SDS – Special Pre-Congress edition happening on October 24!* 

 

 

*This edition of the Speaker Discovery Series is free for Congress delegates!

Learn more about our 2018 Congress sessions, speakers, and register here.

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Case Study, Donor Centric, Ethics, Next Generation Philanthropy, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Originally published on Imagine Canada October 1, 2018.

This summer, I had the privilege of working as the Behavioural Insights Assistant with the Strategic Communications and Research & Evaluation teams at Imagine Canada. We are currently exploring the meaning, influences on, and importance of trust in charities.

I started the summer with curiosity and the desire to further unravel this mysterious concept. As many academics do, I started my search for answers by collecting hundreds of academic articles on the topic. It soon became clear that there isn’t a single unified definition of trust that captures the concept. In fact, a vast majority of articles commented on this lack of cohesion or an agreed upon definition within the literature.

As a thought leader in the charitable sector, Imagine Canada is working on a Trust Project in an effort to better understand the concept and to make it accessible to charity leaders, so they can in turn, work on increasing their trustworthiness with the public and other stakeholders. I invite you to think about how trust impacts your organization and your mission. Here are some key insights from the literature so far. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Announcement.

Advancing Philanthropy – October 2018

 

Read the New Issue

Search Past Digital Issues

Go Green, Go Digital! Update Your AP Profile to Receive Digital Only

Update AP Profile to Get Hardcopy Version

Halloween is on the horizon and pranksters are suiting up as Wonder Woman, Batman, you name it. But superheroes are also a central feature of our October issue—fundraising professionals like you who overcome challenges, conquer fears, and improve lives. Our October issue also shines a light on philanthropy in small towns and rural areas and shortcomings in America’s charitable system. There is work to be done!

To read the new digital issue of Advancing Philanthropy, simply click here!

What does the digital magazine offer? Briefly, you can:

  • email articles;
  • search the entire magazine and archived issues (back to October 2007—just click on the “Archives” tab) by author or key word;
  • link directly to additional resources from each article;
  • save your digital copy as a PDF; and
  • connect instantly to advertisers and resource partners!

To manage whether you receive the print or digital Advancing Philanthropy, simply visit the “MyAFP ProfileMember Gateway” page (www.afpnet.org/MyProfile) on the AFP website.

Members outside the United States and Canada automatically have access to the digital edition of the magazine and may select to receive the print magazine if they wish. Collegiate, Global, Young Professional and Small Organizational members automatically receive the digital magazine only.

For additional information or if you have comments, please contact me at sswift@afpnet.org.

Sincerely,

Susan Drake Swift
Editor, Advancing Philanthropy