Posted by & filed under Career Development, Congress, Fundraising Day, Marketing/Communications, Networking.

By Mo Waja

 

AFP Congress has come and gone but Fundraising Day 2019 seems just around the corner and there are many other conferences on the horizon. Conferences, broadly, are an exciting opportunity to learn and grow through the shared wisdom and thought leadership of speakers, to discover new opportunities through networking, to make new friends with other professionals in the space, and to grow your personal brand as a professional and thought leader within your field.

 

But conferences can also be challenging, and a lot of that comes down to scale. Yes, you are in this focused microcosm of your industry filled with people of, presumably, like mind and like interest, yet you are also one of perhaps over 1,000 delegates, all of whom are looking for new opportunities and new connections. With that being the case, it can seem a daunting task to cut through the noise and have your voice heard amid the many others all pushing for airtime. Tools like social media have made this interesting because, now, most conferences will have a #hashtag of some kind along with a twitter handle, and so for the days of the conference you’ll see a flood of tweets as people capture images, quotes, and key messages that simultaneously express their interest and broadcast their presence at the conference. The thing is, if your goal is to stand out from the crowd, tweeting along in the same way as everyone else still leaves you lost in the crowd. What you need is a way to differentiate yourself so that, whether delegate or speaker, people can tune out a bit of the noise and tune in to you, specifically.

 

To do this well, I would suggest a 5-step process:

  1. Choose a theme for your conference
  2. Start talking about it early (2-3 weeks before it happens)
  3. Produce conference content
  4. Make friends and be places
  5. Keep talking about it (1-2 weeks after it happens)

 

  1. Choose a Theme for Your Conference 

Throughout a conference you will have many conversations. These conversations can take place in person, during workshops, or through the posts you put out via social media. Choosing a theme for your conference means choosing the subject matter that you want to focus on during those conversations, workshops, and posts. This process is very intentional, and the easiest way to understand why is to consider Twitter.

 

Over the course of the conference, there will be a lot of tweets flying around. The challenge is that if everyone is tweeting scattershot and talking about everything, simultaneously, it’s very easy for your voice to get drowned out. One way to cut through the noise is to have a few focused subjects that you choose to talk about. For example, if you, like me, are fascinated by nonprofit storytelling, attend sessions that speak to that and then tweet about them. Doing this consistently positions you as someone who cares about storytelling (or, otherwise, marketing, donor relations, planned giving, etc., depending on your chosen theme) to the conference at large. This makes it easier to connect with people both within and beyond conference attendees who are either of like mind or looking to learn more about your chosen subject. Taking this outside social media, your chosen theme should echo through all your conversations so that every interaction you have at the conference intentionally positions you as a person who cares about a certain relevant subject and knows things about that subject.

 

The beauty of choosing a theme for your conference is that, even if you aren’t a speaker, you can still position yourself as an authority on a subject by adding in your own thoughts and opinions and producing related content.

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Posted by & filed under Career Development, Congress, Mentorship, Networking, Next Generation Philanthropy, Opinion, Special Events.

With Congress a little over a month away and the latest AFP Speaker Discovery Series (Special Pre-Congress Edition!) just around the corner, let’s talk speaking!

 

Every industry has speakers who are a staple within the events circuit, familiar figures on the conference stage; but what happens when the industry changes? Or those speakers start to retire? This year has seen a number of speakers new to the non-profit world or, in fact, new to speaking altogether take the stage – and this is in no small part due to the launch of the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter’s Speaker Discovery Series (SDS).

 

Recently, Laura Champion, Chair of the Education Committee for Congress 2018 and Founder and Chair of the AFP Speaker Discovery Series, sat down with Mo Waja, one of our Congress 2018 Speakers, on the Let’s Talk Speaking podcast to discuss what speaking looks like in the non-profit sector, discovering new speaking talent, and how organizations within and beyond the non-profit industry can begin building their next generation of speakers.

 

Check out the episode below as well as on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher, and don’t forget to buy your tickets for the next SDS – Special Pre-Congress edition happening on October 24!* 

 

 

*This edition of the Speaker Discovery Series is free for Congress delegates!

Learn more about our 2018 Congress sessions, speakers, and register here.