Posted by & filed under Career Development, Next Generation Philanthropy.

This post is a primer for major gift fundraisers who find themselves doing corporate fundraising as part of their daily job. That said, I think this will also be useful to the full service fundraiser as well as the Executive Director who is occasionally asked to join in cause marketing style meetings.

Let’s take a look at the differences between major individual giving and corporate fundraising (often erroneously referred to a corporate philanthropy). I have done both types of giving and am approached regularly by people asking to help their boards, CEOs and staff understand the difference between the two types fundraising, so let’s dive in!

Fundraising: Individual vs Corporate Giving

Let’s start with the difference in motivation between the two camps. I will be speaking in general terms here but it’s important to note that the only rule of thumb is that…there are no rules of thumb! There are always exceptions to the rules but by and large, my experience is that the following is true 90% of the time:

Motivations of the Major Donor

Individuals typically measure the impact of their gift by, well, impact. If an individual lost a relative to an illness and they want to make a donation then they look for social return on their investment. Perhaps the gift is therapeutic, or to cure a disease, or provide a social outcome that they believe in. You the fundraiser are their partner in helping them realize a vision of change within their community or area of interest.

Motivations of the Corporate “Donor”

Some individuals will indeed make gifts through their companies or through their corporate foundations but I would argue that these are not corporate gifts, but individual gifts. You steward these gifts as individuals, ask an individual and report back to an individual. So let’s leave that type of giving aside and focus on the cause-marketing umbrella, at its heart a marketing spend.

Companies exist to make a profit and shareholders invest in companies for a return on that investment. When a company engages a charity, it is seldom framed in this context overtly by the prospect but branding, community engagement, product placement and employee engagement are all desirable to the corporation because they lead to a healthier bottom line in some way. This comes in all shapes and sizes and could be through more engaged staff, brand recognition, product sales or an increase in market share or overall market size.

Pretty simple stuff and nothing groundbreaking here, I know. The impact that this not so subtle difference has on how someone approaches a prospect is tremendous.

Individual vs Corporate Prospects

When I am seeking a major gift, I want to speak to a high net worth individual (and the definition of high net worth depends on my gift goals). I research who they have given to, their net worth, their salary and which influencers I am connected to who can make the introduction. When I talk to them, I ask them about their giving interests and talk about how my projects can help them achieve their philanthropic goals. I am asking them to give me their own personal money and to trust that I will solve a social problem for/with them.

I would never, ever, lead with where I can put their name, how many e-mail addresses I can collect for them, how many free gala passes they will get and how many branded tweets I will send out for them. The idea of approaching a major donor this way is totally ludicrous but we often approach corporate prospects through a major gift lens.

When I am looking to sell sponsorship, run a point of purchase campaign or product placement opportunities I look for people in the marketing, business development, brand and communications departments. When I want to build an employee engagement campaign or community outreach strategy I look for HR people or CSR staff.

In other words, I am asking people to invest their company’s money, not their own. I talk to them about their business goals and how I can help them be more profitable but also how I can help that particular professional meet the goals that they are being measured on (product sales, market share etc.). The only time I am asked about the impact my charity is having on the world in these types of meetings is when it is in the context of their market research. That is, their key demographic (customer, employee, investor etc.) cares about a particular cause and so the company wants to be seen supporting that cause. Just like I would never tell the individual giver about branding opportunities, I would never ask a Brand Director for them to give me a cheque to help my program user for nothing more than the positive impact it will have on society.

How to Know When to Talk Gift vs Investment

You should expect to shift into philanthropy mode when the following happens:

  • You meet in a prospect’s home with their family (though many major donors meet in their offices as well)
  • They share deep personal stories with you
  • When you tell stories about the people/animals/environment that you help they ask to hear more
  • They ask about the social impact of their donation and never move on to how you can help their company

You should shift into marketing mode when the following happens:

  • You are meeting with someone who has any of the following in their title: brand, communications, human resources, CSR (though CSR folks often act like grant givers so this one could go either way!) or who is from a third party marketing or communications company representing a prospect
  • They ask you about your mission and them immediately start to ask you about your database, events, stakeholders, market research etc.
  • They talk about products, market research, proposals and corporate volunteering

The Cause Marketing Meeting Roadmap

My advice to people who are heading in to talk about sponsorship, cause marketing or corporate fundraising in general is to go to the meeting empty handed! Don’t bring a proposal, don’t bring a sponsorship package, don’t bring a leave behind and definitely do NOT bring your case for support!

Go to the meeting with the sole purpose of asking questions and getting the second meeting to present a customized proposal to the decision makers if you and the prospect agree that there could be a fit.

When you go to a meeting, be prepared to answer questions about sponsorship opportunities, volunteer opportunities, key events, the size of your database, who your brand appeals to (if you’ve done the market research, otherwise…don’t guess) and whether or not you have the capacity to deliver on their campaign ideas.When the opportunity comes for you to speak, be sure to end every sentence with a question mark. The following is a good starting point to ask a corporate prospect:

  1. Who is your target audience?
  2. How do you like to engage and market to your customers?
  3. What does your target market value?
  4. What can you tell me about your marketing and sales goals for the coming year?
  5. What would you consider to be the most important elements of a partnership between our two organizations?
  6. The goal of the first meeting is never to close the deal, though it is wonderful when that happens! The goal of the first meeting is to gather information to build a customized proposal and to get the second meeting.

Tracking, Reporting and Measuring Impact

When I report back to major donors, I focus on whether or not we met the mission goals of the project, stayed true to budget and reached the number of people/animals/projects we said we would. I prepare stories and samples of impact, I do site tours and project visits and I bring board members and program users to come to thank the donor and show them how they are making a difference.

When I report back to a corporate entity, I talk about website traffic, product distribution, speaking opportunities, employee volunteer numbers, press pickup and media hits. I create a formal fulfillment package complete with photos, web hits, attendee reports and everything I can to prove that my sponsor got the value I promised them.

If you are a seasoned fundraiser then you already have much of the experience needed to be working with corporate prospects! As you can see by this post, there are some subtleties and differences between the two types of giving and, while the creation of a sponsorship package and valuation requires some technical expertise, you can certainly do well in the first and second meeting by changing your approach slightly based on the principles in this post.

 

ChrisChris Baylis is a fundraising professional with expertise in cause marketing, sponsorship and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Chris has managed both national and local campaigns and is a board member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals in Ottawa.

Chris is also the Founder and Chief Blogger for The Sponsorship Collective and can be found on Twitter @CPBaylis writing about all things cause marketing.

Posted by & filed under Crowdfunding, Digital, Marketing/Communications, Mobile Giving, Next Generation Philanthropy, Social Media, Special Events.

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Jessica Lewis, Fundraising Innovation Consultant, hjc

With all the buzz surrounding the Boston marathon this week, it brings back memories of my last race in New York in November. I caught the marathon bug a few years ago, running my first one in Toronto in 2012 and then Chicago the following year. After running Chicago, I decided that I wanted to complete another major marathon and was determined to run New York.

You can get into the New York marathon by either gaining entry through the lottery system, qualifying with extremely fast race times (speedier than Boston) or signing up with a charity team. I decided to sign up to run and fundraise for Team for Kids, which is the New York marathon’s partner charity that supports New York Road Runners by offering health and fitness programs to children in under-served schools across the United States.

I chose to run with Team for Kids for two main reasons. One, I felt a connection to the cause. Two, the minimum fundraising goal was $2,620 which seemed achievable in comparison to other participating charity requirements. It might not seem like a lot of money, but I knew that I would likely depend on the support of my peers for micro-donations of $25 on average. Breaking down my total goal meant that I would need to get over 100 people to donate to my personal fundraising page. According to The Next Generation of Canadian Giving, 64% of Gen Ys are 1-2 times more likely than Gen X, Boomers and Matures to support someone else raising money on behalf of a charity. Most of my peers fall within Gen Y, so at least I had a better chance at gaining their support!

At hjc, we have been doing a lot more work with our clients around mapping optimal donor journeys, which has often led to improving the overall experience (and conversion rates) for event participants. It got me thinking about my journey running with Team for Kids – from the first touch point of creating a profile online to receiving the alumni newsletter.

If I were to map out my own journey with Team for Kids it would look something like this:

  • I created a profile with Team for Kids and received a confirmation email
  • I received multiple confirmation emails, including an acknowledgment of my self-pledge, a summary of my registration payment and a fundraising agreement outlining my commitment to raise $2,620 by October 1st
  • I received a fundraising kick-off email with ample resources to kick start my fundraising and sent out my first donation e-appeal asking friends and family for support
  • I received the first donation to my personal fundraising page!
  • I received weekly coaching emails over the 5 months leading up to the event, which included both fundraising and training tips, and inspired me to host my own fundraising event
  • I posted a link to my personal fundraising page on Facebook asking my friends for support
  • There were other emails, videos, conference calls that included multiple resources for both fundraising and running. These resources were inspirational and connected me to the cause.
  • I hosted a cocktail party to raise money for Team for Kids and reached my fundraising goal!
  • I got race day reminders (e.g. transportation, pre marathon breakfast) and started packing for my trip to New York
  • I ran the New York marathon!
  • After the event, I received a congratulations email
  • I received a post event survey
  • I am now subscribed to the Team for Kids alumni newsletter

In addition to receiving email communications from Team for Kids, I followed their charity page on Facebook to connect with other participants. Because of this, on the day of the marathon I got the VIP experience and was able to jump on the charity bus to go to the starting line and huddle inside the Team for Kids tent to stay warm. Not to mention, the charity had also arranged for access to hot water for my pre-race ritual meal of oatmeal and a banana. After crossing the finish line, I was welcomed by a nice volunteer who helped me stumble over to the finisher’s tent to rest my tired legs after a grueling 42 kilometers through all 5 boroughs of the city.

My journey from start to finish was fantastic – from the first Team for Kids coaching email to the post-race tent. This could have been dramatically different if the charity didn’t provide me with resources to help me reach my fundraising goal, such as social media banners I could re-purpose for my efforts, or inspirational stories that were shared with me along the way to build my connection to the cause. Not to mention, the race day support like hot water and a cozy post marathon tent. These were moments that mattered to me.

Putting on my consultant hat, they did everything right. Team for Kids provided me with the tools and support to reach my fundraising goal. We know from our work with non-profit clients that journey mapping is effective in increasing donor conversion rates and building more personal relationships with constituents.

Does your organization personalize and optimize the experience for event participants? What does your current journey look like for participants from the time they register to the day of the event? Do you know what your supporters would consider the ‘moments that matter?’

Jessica Lewis is a Fjessicalewisundraising Innovation Consultant at hjc, a global consulting agency in the nonprofit sector. She helps her clients use online technologies to fundraise, advocate and build brand awareness. If you want to chat further about this topic you can reach Jessica at jessica.lewis@hjcnewmedia.comYou can follow her on Twitter @jessklewis.

 

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Crowdfunding, Digital, Ethics, Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications, Next Generation Philanthropy, Opinion, Social Media.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin: Often, it starts with a tragedy, illness, or fueling an ambition. Then it goes viral, raising thousands of dollars for someone in need or for a particular cause. This is the new world of direct giving. But as we see more personal crowdfunding, questions are raised about why we give, how the funds are distributed and what we expect of the role of community and the state in supporting one another. The Agenda takes a look the state of charitable giving in the age of disruptive technology. This program features Caroline Riseboro – AFP Greater Toronto Chapter Board Member and  Senior VP of Development with CAMH Foundation.

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Inspiration, Next Generation Philanthropy, Opinion.

Laura Champion, Donor Relations Coordinator – Direct Response

Crohn’s and Colitis Canada

At almost 30 I still want to change the world. I want to make a difference in people’s lives and I still truly believe that I will do that in my chosen career as a fundraising professional. Some would call me naïve and others would call me ambitious. Recently, I have had two conversations with fundraising colleagues who had completely different vantage points on the topic of ambition.

Colleague One was saying that career ambition is something she feels she should have but does not. While this makes her feel guilty, she has reached the point of wanting the regularity of the 9 to 5 knowing that her non-work life would fulfill her. At the same time, she feels guilty because so many others in our peer group are working toward something different. She also feels a little judged because she found happiness at a level in her career that was/is not enough for others.DON'T QUIT

In contrast, Colleague Two has been chomping at the bit for nearly two years as a fundraiser, making connections and speaking with people on how to innovate their organization. He hustled in the best sense of the word and has not seen the results that he wanted. He says, he has become so frustrated by the sector not embracing his level of ambition he has considered leaving fundraising all together. He is motivated by his desire to support a family but blind ambition has impaired both that goal and his career. His blind ambition is not only impairing his career goals but because he cannot find a job is hindering his ability to reach personal goals, like supporting a family.

I find myself somewhere in the middle of One and Two. There are weeks where I network with industry colleagues almost every day, reading up to 20 fundraising blogs, and checking out job postings to make sure my skills are remaining competitive. Then there are weeks where I just want to go home and catch up with my old friend Netflix. The difficulty of being a young educated professional is that we are bursting with ideas but are not in a position to implement. Some of us are lucky to have supervisors who let us channel this creativity in our roles but I know this is not the case for most.

So what is one to do about all this? How do you channel your ambition is without any of the side effects my colleagues are experiencing? So far this is what I have found works for me:

1) Know thyself. What is your ambition driving you toward? To make a certain salary level, to reach a certain title, to be valuable enough to make your own schedule and hours, to be out of the office in time to take the kids to soccer, or all of the above? Know what it is you want and then be judicious about how you get there. Saying yes to anything is a good way to open doors but if you are not careful it is also a good way to lose focus.

2) Eyes on your own paper. Ambition can be fueled by jealousy and internal expectation. Do your best not to worry what others  and focus on what YOU can be doing to get where you want to go. It is an important reminder of what we all learned at a young age – it does not matter where anyone else on the test, or in this case their career, you will not succeed unless you focus on what you need to do.

3) This is a marathon. As a young professional, you have at least another 35 years ahead of you in your career. You cannot do it all at once.  It can be frustrating in the day to day when ambition or lack thereof is nagging at you but know that whatever you are working toward will all come with time.

As I approach my 30s, I realize that ambition is going to continue to be an important piece of my career puzzle. So fellow fundraisers – how did you figure it out in the early days of your career? Did you find that driving ambition was helpful or tempered level of ambition was just fine?

Let’s talk about it. @charitablelaura

Laura Campion PhotoLaura Champion is Donor Relations Coordinator at Crohn’s and Colitis Canada. She has a thirst for fundraising knowledge and is always open to discussion. You can find her on twitter @charitablelaura.

 

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Inspiration, Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications, Next Generation Philanthropy.

Tara George, CFRE, Senior Vice President – Lead, Search Practice at KCI (Ketchum Canada Inc.), talks career advice with Cynthia Foo, Grants Manager at Environmental Defence.

CF: If you had to pick three “must have” attributes for the fundraiser today, what would you say these would be?

TG: Goal orientation – Regardless of the fundraising role, the individual has to be able to formulate goals, marshal resources, and deliver results. This takes persistence.

Communications savvy – All messages, written and verbal, regardless of channel, have to reinforce the strategy and drive results. Fundraisers have to be exceptional listeners.

Service orientation – The fundraiser has to really seek to spotlight the cause and others’ priorities, rather than one’s own. And if you do that with effective communications savvy, those three things are really fundamental and critical.

CF: How important is the role of a good fundraising manager?

TG: People can learn and model, but training is a factor. In the fundraising world I often hear people describe themselves as a “solo warrior”, or a “lone wolf”. Fundraisers who started young, and never managed other people for example, can get stuck at a certain level because of lack of opportunities to obtain diversity of experience.

So my advice to fundraisers is this: gain people and business management skills – learn about theory, and gain knowledge of best and emerging practices. You don’t become a good manager by accident: continuous learning is a key ingredient of the recipe for success!

CF: What about advice for mid-career fundraisers?

TG: This is the time to broaden your scope of fundraising, gain experience in other areas beyond your narrow field of expertise and prepare for more senior positions. You don’t get to be the CEO if you are just a specialist!

However, I don’t think of a career as a ladder, I think of it as a web. For example, someone who starts in event fundraising may need to go sideways to go up a level. Their event position may lead to an expanded role in communications which develops into learning about digital fundraising, or deeper involvement in annual giving.

I often hear complaints that employers can’t pay for all of employees’ courses and their training, but I say that you are responsible for your life and career – so why wouldn’t you invest in yourself? Don’t let these things stand in the way. I paid for my MBA myself – it was tough, but it was important to my growth, and I’m glad I did it.

CF: What are the three most common mistakes when marketing oneself in the job market?

TG: People come in ready to present their skillsets but they don’t know anything about the organization. Do the research and show your passion and knowledge about the organization and the cause. And it needs to be genuine – you can’t fake it.

The second common mistake is that people are not properly prepared for the interview process. Make sure you understand the role and provide evidence to back up your success. I’m always surprised to see people who can’t clearly identify the metrics of their success – either in percentage or numbers of donors increased. For a group of people who hang their hat on dollars, identifying numbers in their resumes is a must!

Finally, the most common mistake: Being too self-centered – not showing examples of contributing to the success of others and not recognizing the importance of team work.

No one landed their first seven-figure major gift completely single-handedly. Most likely, there was someone who did prospecting, others who did stewardship in the organization and so on. Demonstrating how you work with others is important!

CF: What do you see as reasons for high turnover in the nonprofit sector? And what do you see as the current biggest challenges facing employee retention?

TG: Generally speaking, high turnover in any position in any sector is not healthy and it’s not good for the individual: it can stain their reputation. When there’s supply and demand, the perception that the “grass is greener on the other side” heightens the sense of opportunity. I think people really should do their homework to make sure they can be satisfied and happy where they are and where they think they would like to go.

In my role, I hear people comment that money is the main motivator, but I don’t think it’s that simple. Often people move for personal satisfaction – they want to learn and grow and be challenged. Of course, people want better titles and money. But more importantly, they want to have impact and be engaged in their work, to be respected. Managers can play a huge role in making employees feel really good about their accomplishments and excited about what they’re learning – even when the organization cannot offer more money.

In today’s market, employers are showing less loyalty, so employees are doing the same. I think it’s important that employers hire for values – when that happens, the turnover rates drop. Hire people for their values and retain like-minded people who want to stay.

CF: Thank you so much for your time, Tara! As a parting thought – what are some of the fun things you do in your spare time?

TG: I love to read! I especially love to read novels and read a couple of novels a week. Sometimes I read business books: I enjoyed The End of Competitive Advantage by Rita Gunther-McGrath, which I won as a door prize at Congress. She was an excellent speaker there that year. I also read “Thinking Strategically” by Harvard Business Review, and The First 90 Days by Watkins. Every morning I also scan the Stanford Social Innovation Review, and the Harvard Business Review, in addition to a number of other sites.

 

Tara GeorgeTara George, CFRE – Senior VP Lead, Search Practice, KCI (Ketchum Canada Inc.)

As the Lead Consultant for KCI’s Search Practice, Tara has successfully led more than 150 recruitment assignments for a range of non-profit clients across Canada. A respected advancement professional with extensive networks in Canada and beyond, Tara has a clear sense of the strategic vision, leadership skills and business acumen necessary to succeed in the nonprofit arena.

 

CynthiaFooCynthia Foo – Grants Manager, Environmental Defence

Cynthia Foo is the Grants Manager at Environmental Defence,a national environmental charity that just celebrated its 30th anniversary. She helps strategize, secure and steward foundations’ giving to help her organization grow. She also currently sits on the AFP Toronto Ethics Committee, and serves on the Board of the West-End Food Co-op and the Liaison of Independent Filmmakers of Toronto.

 

Posted by & filed under Campaign, Digital, Marketing/Communications, Mobile Giving, Next Generation Philanthropy.

Beate Sørum

Digital Fundraising Consultant, b.bold

Photo: Nick Ares

People like me always tell you you are losing money by not optimising your web page for mobile, making better forms and clearer content and calls to action. But do you know just how much? I’ve seen some real world-examples lately, and even I was shocked at the sheer amount of money left on the table.

I worked with several appeals for different charities over Christmas, but let’s focus on two of them. Traffic sources where quite similar, and the call to action was pretty much equal, and both campaigns where very successful, and the landing pages where both as close as possible to the actual payment.

One charity managed to get 8% of its mobile visitors to pay. The other only managed to convert 2,5% of its mobile visitors. I did the math. If charity two also managed to convert 8% of their mobile visitors, they would have raised CAD $56.000 more. That is some serious money to walk away from!

Even if we take a lower estimate, like 5%, they would have raised CAD $22.000 more.

So what does this mean for you?

It means that if on a dedicated landing page, you are converting less than 5% of mobile visitors, you are leaving money on the table. Lots of money. I strongly encourage you to find out.

These are some of the things you should look into fixing:

  1. Make sure forms work for mobile visitors. Even if they make up a small share of your donations today, that might just be because you are scaring them away.
  2. Don’t ask unnecessary questions. Yes, it’s nice to know how old your donors are, or how they found you, but is it crucial to processing the donation? If not – get rid of it. Every extra field in your donation forms lower your conversions. You can always ask follow-up questions later.
  3. Does your layout indicate clear paths forward for the user? Pressing the wrong button and having to start over might just make someone give up. This is especially true on mobile, where horisontal scrolling suddenly has to happen to find action buttons.
  4. Remove distractions. Does the landing page for donations have banners leading elsewhere? Is the form hidden far down the page, under menus, copy and unnecessary images? Make it front and center.

Good landing page design is an art and requires expertise, but the tips above should get you started pretty good! Think about the donor first – what are his or her needs in this situation? Make sure you fulfill them – and you’ll see your digital donations climb steadily.

Beate is a well-known international public speaker, who runs digital fundraising consultancy b.bold. She has more than five years of digital fundraising expertise, most of which is from  the Norwegian Cancer Society, where she among other things doubled the digital fundraising return. Her special interests are user experience, landing page and donation form design, content strategy and using social media for donor stewardship. You can follow her on Twitter @BeateSorum

 

 

 

Posted by & filed under Annual Giving, Campaign, Marketing/Communications, Next Generation Philanthropy, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Laura Champion, Donor Relations Coordinator – Direct Response

Crohn’s and Colitis Canada

I am bad with confrontation. My face turns red, I stare at my feet and my first instinct is to run and hide in the corner. It’s a good thing I’m on the phone!

But as fundraisers, we have all been there. The phone rings and on the other side is a very displeased donor. Someone has issued the wrong receipt, sent too much mail or not enough mail. Perhaps they were excluded from a guest list. The donor is unhappy and they want you to know it.

As a millennial, I have easily avoided phone calls most of life. Call display, voicemail, texting and email have made it all too simple for me to go through my whole day without actually speaking to anyone. This has made my conflict resolutions skills mostly text based.

But one of the reasons I am a fundraiser and more specifically, an annual giving fundraiser is that it gives me the chance to speak to so many people. Most interactions are positive and cause my heart to soar!  But every once in a while they are not the same type of inspiring.

laurachampion

Since I have met quite a few text based millennials among my fellow fundraisers, I have put together a few thoughts on how to maintain your composure and ease that pit in your stomach:

1) My motto both in the workplace and out is “Be a person”. Remember the reason that the donor is upset could be heightened by something else going on in their lives. It is a reminder to be kind, be honest and be present for those around you. A kind word from me may be all this donor needs to get through a tough situation.

2) Do not take it personally. It’s easy to internalize the criticism, especially if the mistake was your own. Remember that everyone makes mistakes. When you’ve completed the call with the donor, take a walk or get a coffee and settle back in. It is too easy to carry negativity – be careful not to let it burn you out.

3) Donors want to be heard. Whether it is a compliment, a complaint or a story, people want to feel heard. It is our job as fundraisers to understand that donors are giving to our organization because of a connection. When they take the time to call you – hear them. They are telling you what you can do to retain them long term.

4) Donors do not call unless they care. They do not want to leave your organization – they just want you to make it right. These crisis calls are an opportunity to learn more about these individuals and their motivation for giving.

5) Tell me about a time when… Remember you are always learning and growing in your role. These crisis calls may be difficult but it is important to think of them as an opportunity to improve your skills and gather material for the next interview!

With so much talk emphasis on being donor-centric and taking donors through their journey, we need to remember there may be some wrong turns or road blocks. Ensuring that everyone in your organization understands how to deal with dissatisfied donors without taking it to heart will lead to a healthier organization and a healthier donor base. Retention is the new acquisition.

And keep in mind – you are not alone. We have all been through a crisis – it is part of what forms a great fundraiser. Relationship management means working with donors when they are happy and when they are not.

Laura Campion Photo

Laura Champion is Donor Relations Coordinator at Crohn’s and Colitis Canada. She has a thirst for fundraising knowledge and is always open to discussion. You can find her on twitter @charitablelaura.

Posted by & filed under Analytics, Marketing/Communications, Mobile Giving, Next Generation Philanthropy, Social Media.

Philip King, Founder, The Donation Funnel Project

You’ve probably heard about the new Apple watch, but don’t plan to buy one soon. Unless you’re super geeky, and if so please see me after one of my presentations at this year’s Congress!

But I’ll bet you’ve upgraded your smartphone in the past 18 months.applewatch

Did it hit your radar that Facebook purchased WhatsApp for $19 billion earlier this year? Wonder why a social networking company would pay so much for a messaging app that is popular in Africa and India? The world is changing, particularly from a marketing and communications perspective, and it is becoming harder to get anyone’s attention, including donors.

Let’s consider your new smartphone: I’ll bet you spend more time on it than you did on your old one. In fact, I’ll bet you read your email pretty easily now on that small screen. You may even spend more time on Facebook than you did when Facebook was a desktop/laptop-only experience for you. And with recent upgrades to the cellular data speeds you spend more time using your mobile browser to visit websites, often linked from your email or Facebook.

If you’re having this experience, it’s not hard to imagine that your donors are too. Of course you’ll have all sorts of demographic tribes in your donor base: young/old, male/female, rich/not-so-rich. And these tribes will all behave in slightly different ways. But one thing is for sure: they’re all going mobile!

I’ll jump straight to the punchline: take out your smartphone. Go to your charity’s website. Make a $5 donation.

How did that feel? For most of you not so great. Still using only your smartphone try registering for that run/walk next month, or buying tickets to the gala dinner. You get the point. Our websites haven’t kept up with our donors’ handheld technology. Even websites that are “responsive” can be clumsy to use and result in “bounce” or an “abandoned visit”: two of the most dreaded terms for online fundraisers.

Now fast forward to the not-too-distant future and imagine when donors start reading their email, checking Facebook and visiting websites on their watch… Last year we could comfort ourselves and say “that’s OK, most of our donors visit our website or Facebook page on their laptops or desktops.” But for many fundraisers this changed in 2014. The mobile tipping point has already passed, or will happen sometime in the next 12 months. Try this: get your team to estimate which month your “tipping point” will occur for your organization: the month at which most of your website audience will view you through a mobile device.

If you’re interested in topics like this I hope you’ll join me for one of my sessions at Congress, and we’ll discuss questions such as:

  • How much lower are average smartphone donations compared to laptops and tablets?
  • Who is doing a great job with mobile communications, and what does that look like?
  • What opportunities will mobile give us to find new donors and new dollars?

Philip King is the founder of The Donation Funnel Project: an experiment in online and mobile fundraising. Prior to that he has a long and successful track record as a digital fundraiser as the President and CEO of Artez Interactive, VP of Mobile for Cornerstone, and VP of E-Business at the United Way of Greater Toronto. He has worked with some of the world’s leading fundraising teams including Comic Relief in the UK, Leukaemia Foundation in Australia, UNICEF and SickKids Foundation in Canada, and the Humane Society of the United States. Philip will be presenting at Congress 2014 and you can follow him on Twitter @PhilipKingIV

 

 

 

Posted by & filed under Crowdfunding, Gamification, Marketing/Communications, Mobile Giving, Next Generation Philanthropy.

Angela Simo Brown – Director of Social Change Strategy and Co-founder

AIR MILES for Social Change, AIR MILES Reward Program/LoyaltyOne

Gamification is here to stay – and charities would do well to use this concept to make giving fun. It is important for charities to capitalize on our human habits and desires in order to grow donations in a shrinking donor base environment. We like games, we like our phones, and we like being winners. We also are looking for purpose and meaning and how we can make a difference. Mobile gamification for charitable causes can give us what we need.

And it doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive either. Instead of building a game from scratch, charities should look to a corporate partner to co-create the solution. One example is mobile game developer XEOPlay who created Tilt World, a game that helps to reforest Madagascar. Points earned in the game translate to tree seeds purchased for and on behalf of the tree-planting charity WeForest. XEOPlay’s goal is to plant 1 million trees in Madagascar, which is suffering from the effects of deforestation. Another example is Games for Good, who donates a fraction of a cent to charity every time you play their games. Or more simply, it can be a voting game, like Fido and Evergreen’s 2011 ‘Share Your Care’ program. Fido donated $100,000 that was divided between 20 different local environmental projects based on Canadians voting online for their favourite project.gamification

AIR MILES for Social Change has been partnering with different charities for the past 4 years by using reward miles as a carrot to increase giving and engagement with nonprofits. We infused gamification and behavioural economics motivational concepts into these initiatives with good success and have learned a lot in the process. Here is a list of top 5 lessons we’ve observed on how charities can best engage with today’s donor:

  1. People give to be personally recognized, not necessarily because they are emotionally connected to the cause: People like to be seen giving – in fact for many nowadays this is the main reason they give. They want their peers to see the good they have done, and some are defining their giving as a social measure of their personal success. So a tax receipt and thank you letter just aren’t enough anymore. Charities need to make sure that they are giving the types of recognition that people want today, and often social media recognition to the most cost-effective tool to use.
  2. People give to support their friends vs the cause more than ever: Fundraisers where donors reach out to their network have been around for years. These programs are generally more successful because people like to support their friends. The next evolution of fundraising is in driving more value from peer-to-peer donor networks. Crowdfunding is exploding. See the amazing success of pooling platforms such as Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Causevox. Charities should piggyback off of these platforms and capitalize on their popularity.
  3. People want frequent touch points of thanks and celebration for their giving: Social media has trained us all to expect frequent virtual hugs and celebration by way of badges, trophies, congratulations and thank yous. We want to be told all the time how good we are. Rightly or wrongly, these are the new table stakes and charities need to give this recognition and appreciation to their donors more frequently. The thanks and recognition can be small, fleeting, and inexpensive to deliver at a regular cadence via social media.
  4. People want experiences to be social and fun: Gamification is one way to do this, as well as events where donors can be active participants, plus consumer-led social media movements like the Ice Bucket Challenge. Although movements are a fleeting and time-limited way to fundraise, the way that people engaged with the Ice Bucket campaign is different than ever before. Making giving into a game has proven to be a great way to engage a high number of people across multiple demographics and regions, and is an emerging trend that charities can’t afford to ignore.
  5. Youth want to make a difference hands-on: Youth want to tangibly experience the difference they are making, and just making a donation to an organization to do the work for them doesn’t suffice for this cohort. They want to donate their time, energy, spirit and dollars to grassroots organizations, and the most successful programs are going to be led by youth. See the popularity of giving initiatives such as community Giving Days, or PhilanthroTeens.” In addition to the hands-on experience, youth want to be able to share their experiences with others.  Social media and games are the best way to engage the new youth donor segment.

The other key success factor is of course, mobile. People love their phones and the more they can do with their phones the more they will engage with your brand and the cause.

A megatrend of our time is that people are actively looking for new and impactful ways to make a difference. Charities offer up all the things we are looking for but they need to proactively shake up the way giving is done today. Gamification, crowdfunding and behavioural economics will be three key elements for successful, fun and rewarding giving programs of the future.

AngelaSB

Angela leads the shared value, cause marketing strategy and program development for the AIR MILES Reward Program, Canada’s premier coalition loyalty program. Under Angela’s leadership, AIR MILES has developed over 25 innovative program partnerships across the public, nonprofit and private sectors that have driven record increases in positive behavior change in healthy living, energy conservation and increased transit use. An engaging speaker, Angela has spoken at many conferences about the power of creating shared value using social change and cause marketing strategies.