Posted by & filed under Career Development, Congress, Leadership/Management, Speakers.

Elischer_Tony

Tony Elischer, FinstF (Cert)

Managing Director, THINK Consulting Solutions

I have been coming to the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter Congress now for over seventeen years and continue to prioritise my invitations in my  speaking and travel schedules, but why?

I clearly recall meeting a leading American fundraiser many years ago who declared that “America had basically invented philanthropy and fundraising”. “Excuse me”, I thought, “Shouldn’t we recognise that philanthropy is pretty universal and perhaps has a little more ownership, if not history, in Europe?” On the fundraising call I think I must concede as America did pretty much invent the foundations of what we now know as professional fundraising.

When I started in fundraising, over thirty years ago, I was told to look to America for cutting edge fundraising practice, innovation and inspiration. This I did as an enthusiastic young fundraiser and I learnt a lot. However, since those days the world has changed and now we look around the world to different reference points for insights, learnings and inspiration. So what do we look to Canada for? I hear you ask. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Social Media, Speakers.

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Julia Silvestri Wong

Client Success Manager,  Artez Interactive Inc.

Fear – such a small word but it holds so much power.

Fundraisers are fearless, right? You have to be able to walk into the office of the CEO at TD Bank asking for a cool million to upgrade the gym so that the “street kids” can play basketball after school; or  – stand up in front of your Board of Directors and justify why you spent 21% of the budget on fundraising expenses this year. We muster up the confidence of all of those who went before us, put our heads down, and get our jobs done. It’s just the way fundraisers roll.

But what happens when the fear creeps in? When your idea for a great fundraising campaign is given the green light by the Big Boss and now you have to run with it; or you’ve been called up to the big leagues to share your quirky little presentation on social media and fundraising? Why do we become so paralyzed by fear when the stakes are so high personally?

Fear is defined as an unpleasant emotion caused by the belief that someone or something is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat. When we are emotionally invested in something the fear of putting ourselves out there and failing feels very dangerous and painful.

One of my favourite parts in my upcoming AFP Fundraising Day session, Excuse me, did you say social media budget?, is at the very end when we talk about being confident, bold, humble, and fun. When you put those four elements into your work and your life there is no room for fear.

Because let’s face it: fear is nothing compared to that feeling of putting yourself out there and succeeding.

Julia Silvestri Wong is a Client Success Manager at Artez Interactive Inc.  She will be presenting: “Excuse Me, Did You Say Social Media Budget?” at Fundraising Day 2013. You can connect with Julia on Twitter @PinksheepTo or LinkedIn Julia.Silvestri.


Posted by & filed under Data Management, Metrics, Speakers.

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Jody Dailey, CFRE, Associate Executive Director, Advancement Services, Ryerson University and Len Gamache, CFRE.

Data Security vs. Data Collection

“Big Data” seems to be all the buzz these days, but what does it mean for our development programs?

Many organizations are using reams of information that they have collected over the past number of years to make strategic decisions and predict outcomes. The growing viewpoint seems to be: “Keep everything because you don’t know when you might need it”.

But we were fortunate to hear a presentation recently from Kirk Bailey, Chief Information Security Officer, University of Washington. He detailed what keeps him up at night. Not least of which is the fact that 70 countries have active cyber-infiltration programs and his job is to monitor activity to ensure they don’t get access to any data systems at his university. His advice was loud and clear — store and use only the data you need and no more!

So what’s an organization to do with these two conflicting views of the world? Here is some practical advice… Read more »

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Speakers.

Amy Wilkinson

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AMY WILKINSON
Director, Community Giving
Centre for Addiction & Mental Health (CAMH) Foundation

One of my staff recently called me her mentor. First off, I think I am too young to be a mentor. Or at least I like to think I am too young. Secondly, I feel I have so much to learn about our shared profession of fundraising that I couldn’t possibly be someone’s role model.

But it got me thinking. What did the me of 10 or 15 years ago aspire to be? Have my aspirations changed over time? Am I there yet?

I didn’t start out to be in fundraising. It sort of found me. But even though I had a few false starts early in my career, I can’t say that my aspirations are any different than when I first entered the workforce to what they are now. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Leadership/Management, Speakers.

ROB DRYNAN
Executive Director, Jays Care Foundation

If you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you always got ~ Mark Twain

This posting is about risk – specifically professional risk and organizational risk. A number of years ago, I decided to leave my position in advertising to take on the leadership role of Camp Oochigeas –  a small charity that I had recently volunteered for. At the time, I thought it was a career-limiting move. It turned out to be the best career decision I have made to date. I didn’t know a lot about the sector. In fact, I picked up a copy of Fundraising for Dummies to prepare for my interview. But taking the risk paid off with great rewards.

Many of the successes at Camp Ooch – and the reason I won the AFP New Fundraising Professional Award a while back, was because we decided to take a different approach from the tried and true fundraising methods of that time. A great example of this is the Sporting Life 10k run in support of Camp Ooch. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Congress, Marketing/Communications, Speakers, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

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TOM AHERN

Chief Mind, Ahern Communications Ink.

Elevator Speech? Ride to Nowhere. It’s the wrong answer to a great question.

You know the premise. You’re on an elevator with someone else. And in the course of a short ride, you explain your nonprofit’s work so well that you convince your listener to embrace your cause.

To steal a line from Aaron Sorkin, “What could possibly go wrong?”

Well, for one thing, the conceit suggests an attentive audience. I.e., the other person shuts up and listens. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Congress, Direct Mail, Marketing/Communications, Social Media, Speakers, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

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BEATE SØRUM

Consultant, Fundraising & Digital Communication, Norwegian Cancer Society

So, I keep hearing people speak about digital fundraising with a bit of fear in their voice. It’s this new thing, a thing that we don’t really know how to deal with. And we keep expecting it to raise loads of money, and yet it really doesn’t, and we can’t quite figure out why, and then everyone get’s frustrated. I think we’re overcomplicating things. In my opinion, digital fundraising is the exact same thing that we have been doing forever, just adapted to new channels.

If you look at it, what are the elements of classical fundraising?

Telling a story
Making an ask
Using emotions
Being the solution to a defined problem
A well crafted response channel Read more »

Posted by & filed under Board of Directors, Congress, Leadership/Management, Social Media, Speakers.

DON TAPSCOTT

Author, Speaker and Advisor on Media, Technology and Innovation

As we enter the networked age philanthropy is going through a profound change. This has big implications for fundraisers and donors alike.  In the old model, not-for-profits sought funds from individuals and institutions. Donors were courted and if successfully seduced, they provided funds, and were thanked.  But today because of a number of factors, most notability the Internet’s slashing of transaction and collaboration costs, charities can now build deep relationships with philanthropists.

Donors today can become more deeply engaged with causes. All parties become part of a network and therefore can view themselves differently. Donors become more like investors in social innovation, and are looking for a return on their investment. Charities can view themselves as participants in complete networks for solving problems, with more sustainable funding. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Congress, Major/Planned Gifts, Metrics, Speakers.

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CHAD GOBEL

President, Gobel Group

Do you know your ten most important numbers to becoming a top advancement producer? We call them your Key Metrics for Major Gifts. In this blog, we’ll help you identify your metrics and put you on a path to closing more and larger major gifts. So how do you identify your Key Metrics? Let’s start with the first number you need to know.

1. What is your annual goal?

Have you established an annual goal for how much money you expect to raise this year in major gifts? If you have, great… if you haven’t, here is a technique for creating your goal?

The most effective approach to goal-setting is to base your number on your pipeline, not a pre-determined amount based on your level or role. Begin the goal-setting process by reviewing your pipeline to identify a realistic but aggressive goal for dollars raised (cash and pledges) for your next year. In particular, you should look at prospects in a Solicited or Ready to Solicit status, and perhaps those in Cultivation or Stewardship status that will be ready for an ask in the next year. From this review, you will be able to identify those prospects who will be asked for a gift in the next year and the anticipated amount of each gift. This becomes the basis for your goal for dollars raised.

For the purpose of this blog, let’s use $100,000 as a goal for dollars raised. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Congress, Speakers.

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BROCK WARNER

Donor Programs Officer, War Child

You’re drawing a blank. You’ve just been asked by your director, or board, for recommendations on the upcoming campaign, and you were sure you had a great idea two weeks ago, but now… nothing.

We’ve all been there. Don’t worry, you’re not on your own. The AFP Greater Toronto Chapter Blog is here to help!

We’re excited and proud to tell you that over the next few months we’ll be sharing blog posts from 2012 Congress speakers on a variety of topics, including: major gifts, donor stewardship, communications, social media, planned giving and many more.

Read more »