Posted by & filed under Case Study, Leadership/Management, Major/Planned Gifts, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Karen Willson, CFRE, Senior VP & Partner, KCI (Ketchum Canada Inc.) 

Heather Hurst, President & CEO, Humber River Hospital Foundation

Yes, this was the situation for Humber River Hospital, when the Campaign started in 2011. Heather and I have been ‘joined at the hip’ to create the winning strategy and have been continually adapting our planning as the Campaign progress.

Due to the magnitude of the new hospital initiative, the private sector goal was pre-established as $225 Million. At KCI, we are aware that Hospital Foundations are being put in the challenging position of having to strive for larger and larger goals based on project costs, rather than on  their own readiness in relation to such factors as strength of their prospect base, availability of volunteers, clarity of case, etc. This intensifies the pressure between the Hospitals and their Foundations. The Hospitals require the flow of funds at certain dates, yet the Foundations’ are dependent on the ability of their volunteers to reach out to philanthropists and, the decision-making process of their donors. KCI is seeing this as a common trend in the Hospital sector (see Philanthropic Trends for more information).

              photo credit: Rusty Russ via photopin cc

Due to the strength of the Case i.e.: 1) the first hospital to be built in Ontario in 25 years; 2) the level of technology that would be incorporated to improve healthcare; and 3) the attention on the patient experience, with the support of my Foundation Board – we rose to this challenge. Karen and I knew we were working with a team of committed volunteer leaders, had secured a $10 Million lead gift and had an exciting case. The new hospital would definitely be ‘revolutionizing healthcare’ in this Province.

We created a traditional gift range chart with a lead gift of $50 Million, built our Top 100 prospect list, recruited our volunteers and marched forward with a sense of enthusiasm and optimism.

A new donor stepped up to support his physician and was so thrilled that the new hospital would be putting Humber River on the map that he joined our campaign cabinet. The Italian community is coming together with group gifts that they hope will inspire others to give. Hospital front-line staff have come forward to donate because they know they will be making a difference to patient care… in fact Environmental Services at all three sites have a 100% donation record!

Our team of Foundation staff is 20 strong. We have divided the Campaign activity into a number of pillars (Catchment Area, Downtown Core, Family Campaign, etc.) and have aligned our team members (both staff and volunteers) to these particular areas. Our goal in aligning staff in this manner is to make sure that the team not only feels a sense of accomplishment but, has fun along the way.

Advice to our colleagues in leading campaigns where a goal is pre-determined is as follows:

  • Set the course of action with the Hospital Leadership and Hospital Board being actively involved
  • Do not assume that the Hospital’s Leadership understands how the fundraising process works….educate, educate and educate
  • Set up regular communications lines between the Hospital and Foundation. We hold quarterly meetings with the Chair of the Hospital Board, Hospital CEO and Chair of Foundation Board (with both of us)
  • Be sympathetic and understanding of the pressures of Hospital leadership as they work to complete this project ‘on budget and on time’.

We are now closing in on $70 Million and have extensive call activity in the pipeline.  When the doors open in October 2015, this Foundation will have taken every step to help the hospital in securing the $225 Million needed.

We will keep you posted on our progress!

KWAs Senior Vice President at KCI, Karen Willson provides strategic direction and project supervision to her clients. This high level of professionalism and expertise was evident in her supervision of the University of Waterloo’s $260 million capital campaign, which exceeded its goal by $353 million. Karen recently worked with Habitat for Humanity Canada, and is currently providing counsel to Humber River Hospital, Women’s College Hospital, Camp Oochigeas and the Elizabeth Fry Society.

HHHeather Hurst has been in the nonprofit sector for 25 years. Heather is now the President and CEO of the Humber River Hospital Foundation and is responsible for the planning and execution of the $225M Capital Campaign for HRH’s new digital hospital. Prior to joining HRH in 2011, Heather was the President and CEO for 7 years at West Park Healthcare Centre and Vice-President of Development and Campaign Director at St. Michaels Hospital Foundation for over 6 years.

 

Posted by & filed under Congress, Major/Planned Gifts, Marketing/Communications, Speakers, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Rory Green – Associate Director, Advancement, Faculty of Applied Science 

Simon Fraser University

A good conversation with a donor has almost nothing to do with what you say.

What matters most is how you listen.

photo credit: niclindh

I have been on countless donor meetings, accompanied by an eager major gifts officer who has so much to say about their organization – they pitch all areas of their non-profit’s mission at lightning speed, and leave the donor a bit dizzy – and quite often completely disinterested.

I want to let you in on a secret: major gifts isn’t about being able to make a great pitch, it’s about asking great questions and listening really well.

Major gifts officers need to be able to have great conversations with donors. Conversations about hopes, values and beliefs. The key to taking a conversation to a more meaningful level is to build likability, rapport and trust. As fundraisers, we need to be experts at creating rapport – and creating it quickly. Here are some ways you can listen better – that have been proven to build trust fast.

Match Tone: Listen to the tone and speed of the donor’s voice. Do your best to, naturally, match them in tempo, volume and pitch. I’m not telling you to do a fake accent, or impression of them – just be aware of the sound and cadence of their voice and make subtle adjustments.

Affirm and Acknowledge: We need verbal and non-verbal cues we are being heard. Small nods, and “mmhmms” give us permission to continue sharing. Often as we are listening to our donor, our mind begins to race ahead to what we want to say next. Don’t do that! Stay in the moment and focus on hearing what is being said.

Smile: Early on in my major gifts career, I realized I had an awful listening face. When someone is talking to me, I can scrunch my brow – and almost scowl. I look angry, even when I’m not! So, as Tyra Banks wold say, I’ve worked a lot on “smiling with my eyes”. Try asking for feedback on your listening face from family and friends, and when you’re trying to build rapport be sure to smile!

Mirror Body Language: Again, this should be done subtly – but pay attention to how the person you are speaking to is positioned. Are they leaning forward? Back? How is their posture? Mirroring body language puts the person you are talking to at ease, and helps them to feel relaxed.

Synchronize Breath: This is an odd tip, but there is a good amount of research behind this. Try to match the breathing of the person you are having a conversation with, it creates a strong subconscious sense of commonality.

These tricks sound basic, but they are incredibly effective. Try it out yourself. Spend as much time learning about how to be a good listener as you spend learning about your mission and programs.

Want to learn more? Or better yet – have the chance to practice these tips and get live feedback? Come to Congress this November and check out my workshop “Meaningful Conversations (That Raise More Money)”.

Happy Listening!

 

Rory Green has been in the philanthropic sector for over eight years and is currently the Associate Director, Advancement for the Faculty of Applied Science at Simon Fraser University. Rory has also worked in major and corporate giving at BCIT and the Canadian Cancer Society. In her spare time Rory is the founder and editor of Fundraiser Grrl, the fundraising community’s go-to source for comic relief . She will be presenting at Congress 2014 in Toronto.

 

Posted by & filed under Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications, Networking, Next Generation Philanthropy, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Colin Hennigar, Associate Director, SickKids Foundation 

How do you engage a group of young professional major gift donors? Listen to them.

Fundraisers are frequently challenged to grow their pipeline to secure major gifts, often with the expectation of a donation to be confirmed over a year or two. But what happens when you invest in laying the seeds of philanthropy in the next generation? Results.

When we asked what is important for young professionals who make a donation, over and above purchasing an event ticket, we directly heard that they want a tangible impact, exclusivity, and networking opportunities. Solicitations for unrestricted funds don’t often appeal to this group – they want to know how their donation will make an impact. They want to meet the experts who will use their donation. They also want to be part of something bigger than themselves. They want to look around the room and see like-minded philanthropists who are all at the same stage in life and have rallied together to make a difference. They want to share their involvement with their peers and get them engaged as well. We see this in donors who come together to build a house or school or participate in a team fundraising event, but now we’re starting to see it in major gifts programs.

What we’re doing at SickKids Foundation is challenging young professionals to think big – to make an investment through a program that will see them surrounded by their peers, that will give them access to the organization’s leadership, and that will allow them to make a collective impact. The result of listening to this demographic is SickKids Innovators which saw 20 individuals invest $100,000 in an underfunded priority of the hospital last year.

Access to the hospital’s leadership and exclusive experiences isn’t free. In terms of stewarding this group of young professional donors, we do have to bend the rules or adapt the conventional donor matrix to develop meaningful events and opportunities. What we have to keep in mind is that we listen to what will engage this group. As they progress in their careers, with the philanthropic seeds planted, their involvement can expand to additional gifts through cause marketing campaigns or third party events enhancing their commitment to the organization.

Today, fundraisers need to adapt our traditional ways of engaging donors, especially as we work with groups of like-minded philanthropists, such as young professionals. What we need to do is listen, create, engage and then wait patiently for the results, if not today, then definitely tomorrow.

Colin Hennigar is an Associate Director on the Major Gifts Team at SickKids Foundation. Prior to joining SickKids Foundation in 2010, Colin held a number of roles at the Royal Ontario Museum Governors Office. Colin graduated from the University of Toronto with a Double Major in Fine Art History and Classical Civilizations and a Master’s Degree in Museum Studies. He will be speaking at Fundraising Day 2014 on May 28th in Toronto. You can follow Colin on Twitter @travellercolin 

Posted by & filed under Congress, Crowdfunding, Marketing/Communications, Social Media, Speakers, Stewardship/Donor Relations, Volunteers.

Robert C. Osborne, Jr., Principal, The Osborne Group, Inc.

crowd

If you go to any crowdfunding platform and search past the featured projects on the home page you’ll see that many, if not most of these projects are well behind in their goals. Sometimes it is because the project

isn’t a very compelling one, sometimes it is because the media associated with project isn’t very well done, and sometimes it’s because the rewards aren’t well thought out. But I would argue that in almost all cases the real underlying reason for lack of success is a lack of planning.

Here are some tips for successful crowdfunding:

If you build it they will NOT come – If you simply throw up a crowd funding project on IndieGoGo or some other crowdfunding website and hope that people will stumble across it and give, you are in for disappointment. This pretty much never happens. You need to drive people to your project and this takes a little thought and planning.

Think through your mediaHaving good pictures and video for your crowdfunding campaign is critical. Take the time to think through what your messages are. Remember that you want to talk about future impact. What will be different in the world tomorrow because I gave money to your project today? Read more »

Posted by & filed under Congress, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Emma Lewzey, CFRE, Senior Major Gifts Officer, St. Michael’s Hospital Foundation

If you work in a small or mid-size shop, there is a clear path to stability and sustainability for your organization. You need to focus on the right donors: individual donors. Now, don’t get me wrong – corporate gifts, special events, and foundation grants can all play an important role in a balanced and diversified fundraising program.

The reality is that individual donors give the vast majority of philanthropic gifts – here in Canada, the latest available stats show that 71% of donations come from individuals, followed by foundations at 16%, and corporations at 11%. If you are like most small to mid-size organizations you and/or your team are probably spread pretty thin – you’re wearing multiple hats, and have a diverse range of responsibilities in your portfolio. And chances are, you’re not spending 71% of your fundraising time and resources focusing on individuals. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Congress, Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Alan Clayton, Director, Clayton Burnett Ltd.

If it doesn’t, I’m leaving.

Human emotions are complicated and infinite in their variety and combinations. I was asked recently by a journalist ‘Does guilt have a place in fundraising?’ I asked her, ‘please define guilt.’ When she failed to do so, I politely declined the interview. Of course guilt has a place in fundraising as does every emotion that anyone is capable of experiencing and transmitting.

‘Guilt’ is only a hair’s breadth away from ‘pity,’ which in itself is only a razor’s width away from ‘compassion.’ Only a judgmental fool would try and define the difference and preach to us which of our emotions is acceptable and which is not. What I feel as guilt, you may feel as compassion and someone else may feel as religious duty. We are all right.

live-laugh-loveFor fundraising to succeed, and for donors to have the experience of it they deserve, a gamut of emotions is involved. The donor journey is a repeating loop of:

• ‘Reward’ emotion.

• ‘Need’ emotion.

• (rational pause to check out the facts.)

• Gift.

The power of the need emotion is the cause of much controversy, of course. It’s a debate we should have widely in our sector. I look forward to it. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Congress, Diversity, Marketing/Communications, Speakers, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Judith Nichols, Ph.D., CFRE

Author, Consultant, New Directions in Philanthropy

Looking for new donors? Trying to hold on to the donors you have? Understanding who’s in your donor pool – or who should be – is the first step to growing a larger, more loyal group of supporters. 

Fundraisers are beginning to recognize the need to market differently to audiences with different backgrounds using demographics and psychographics to uncover similarities and differences among potential donors:

–  Demographics: Demographics are sets of characteristics about people that relate to their behavior as consumers. Age, sex, race, marital status, education and income are used most frequently.

–  Psychographics: These are measures of attitudes, values or lifestyles. They are the entire constellation of a person’s attitudes, beliefs, opinions, hopes, fears, prejudices, needs, desires and aspirations that, taken together, govern how he/she behaves. This, in turn, finds holistic expression in a lifestyle. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Congress, Small Shop, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Ann Rosenfield, MBA, CFRE 1216698031

Executive Director, The WoodGreen Foundation 

Pssst! Small shop fundraisers. Want to hear a secret? While you and I can list 101 disadvantages to being in a small shop, there are HUGE and I do mean HUGE advantages to being small.

So disadvantage reason #96 is I have to run all my own tax receipts and stuff the envelopes personally. But that is also a HUGE advantage for several reasons. Thanks to the relatively small volume of gifts:

  • I can actually hand sign all of the tax receipts
  • I know the name of pretty much every single donor to my organization
  • I easily affix live postage stamps to all tax receipts Read more »

Posted by & filed under Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Jennifer Auten, Resource Development Communications Amnesty International

I’m the first to admit that fundraising often doesn’t make sense to me. As a professed perfectionist with a Communications background, I tend to get excited about slick-looking, brief creative. In other words, it’s a good thing I’m not responsible for our Direct Mail program.

Fundraising laughs in the face of our assumptions. Here we are in this so-called paperless digital age, attached to smart phones that we rarely use as phones, and yet, where do we find our new donors? On the street, at their doors, in their mailboxes and (gasp!) on the phone. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Special Events, Stewardship/Donor Relations, Volunteers.

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JOCELYN FLANAGAN
President and CEO, e=mc2 events

As the need for fundraising occurs with greater frequency, so too does the need for unique fundraising strategies. We have gained an appreciation that – when it comes to fundraising, we need to be doing more than just asking people to reach into their pockets. Guests are attending event after event and they need to understand the difference from one to the next.

We’ve identified the three ‘e’s’ of fundraising to help generate the maximum revenues and impact. None of the “e”s are new concepts, but we have noticed that when we can find ways to combine them all at the same time, the impact is significant.

  1. Emote – When we can create an emotional connection to the organization, guests are substantially more likely to want to contribute.  It is important to understand the audience and draw on their emotions – by testimonials, impactful stories, visuals of successes of the organization, etc. It is important to think about what might resonate with each audience member and why. Read more »