Posted by & filed under Announcement, Inspiration, Leadership/Management.

The AFP Greater Toronto Chapter is now accepting nominations for the 2018 New Fundraising Professional Award. Established in 2001, this award recognizes fundraisers who are making an outstanding contribution to the profession early on in their careers.

We are inviting submissions to nominate chapter members with 2 to 5 years of full-time fundraising experience. Candidates must have demonstrated early fundraising success, articulated their short- and long-term career objectives, and demonstrated a commitment to volunteering and service to the profession. Please take a moment to consider nominating an AFP Member whose work has provided a powerful inspiration to others, and who has made a commitment to building a career in the non-profit sector. Self-nominations are welcome. The individual will be honoured at the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter’s Fundraising Day Luncheon on Tuesday June 12, 2018.

The deadline for receiving the completed nomination form is Friday, May 4 at 5:00pm.

If you have any questions, please contact Cynthia Quigley, Director AFP Canadian Services & Greater Toronto Chapter at 416-941-9212 or cquigley@afptoronto.org.

 

Thank you for your commitment to advancing ethical fundraising and for your continued support of AFP.

 

Krishan Mehta, PhD

Chair, New Fundraising Professional Award Selection Committee
Association of Fundraising Professionals Greater Toronto Chapter


 

 

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

It is with heavy heart that we must inform you that one of our members, Robert Pierre Tomas, has passed away.

Robert Pierre Tomas born June 8, 1965 in Chestahova,Poland, died tragically by drowning in Turks and Caicos April 1st, 2018. Robert was one of a kind: handsome, brilliant, funny, multilingual, generous and creative. His love of life, frankness and curiosity made him a force to be reckoned with. He loved the arts but read about astro-physics and mathematics for fun. He received a Canada Council grant for a novel he wrote retelling The Tempest during the Bosnian War. Robert had an encyclopaedic knowledge of classical music, served as a Juno judge and reviewed CD’s performances for Whole Note and other publications. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Announcement.


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Dear Readers:

Welcome to the NEW Advancing Philanthropy! It’s time for change! These words apply to articles such as the cover story “Rebels, Renegades, and Pioneers” by Simone Joyaux and Ligia Peña, creators of the path-breaking conference track, and “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On,” Daryl Upsall’s heartfelt report on fundraising heroes who have shaken up the system to enact progress. It’s time for change! also refers to Advancing Philanthropy’s new look, from font to paper to binding to photography to graphic design. We would appreciate it if you would take time to review these changes and share any feedback on content or format you might have for future issues. Thank you!

To read the new digital issue of Advancing Philanthropy, simply click here!

What does the digital magazine offer? Briefly, you can:

  • email articles;
  • search the entire magazine and archived issues (back to October 2007—just click on the “Archives” tab) by author or key word;
  • link directly to additional resources from each article;
  • save your digital copy as a PDF; and
  • connect instantly to advertisers and resource partners!

To manage whether you receive the print or digital Advancing Philanthropy, simply visit the “MyAFP ProfileMember Gateway” page (www.afpnet.org/MyProfile) on the AFP website.

Members outside the United States and Canada automatically have access to the digital edition of the magazine and may select to receive the print magazine if they wish. Collegiate, Global, Young Professional and Small Organizational members automatically receive the digital magazine only.

For additional information or if you have comments, please contact me at sswift@afpnet.org.

Sincerely,
Susan Drake Swift
Editor, Advancing Philanthropy

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Fundraising Day.

Join us as we dive deeper into the fundraising topics that matter to you!

Fundraising Day has long stood as the best one-day educational conference for our profession. It is a place where fundraisers at all levels can come together to learn, network and soak up equal parts of inspiration and aspiration. This year, Fundraising Day 2018 (FD2018) will be all of that and so much more, as we dive deeper into the issues and trends that will have you are the forefront of fundraising.

 

If you have attended AFP conferences before, you already know that you will be treated to top-notch presentations by fundraising leaders speaking on a variety of topics that are not only vital to our sector, but to your professional development as a whole.  However, how many times have you attended a session where the presenter would have liked to elaborate on a particular point or have gone deeper on a subject … if only they had more time?

 

This year, we are introducing five DEEP DIVE learning sessions on the most urgent and compelling topics – Major Gifts, Corporate Partnerships, Leadership Development, Mass Marketing & Donor Digital Engagement, and Data Analytics – each will run for two hours. These sessions will be curated by diverse expert leaders who will bring creativity to the subject, as well as a commitment to designing a session that is fun, engaging and provides a deeper understanding of the topic.

 

In addition to the DEEP DIVE sessions and 12 other learning sessions, FD2018 will also feature:

  • Six informal – yet practical – 45 min learning opportunities to kick off your Fundraising Day that we are calling ‘The 6ix’
  • Sabrina Pourmand – an international keynote speaker from one of the world’s leading NGOs, charity: water
  • A new Masterclass learning opportunity specially curated for senior fundraisers
  •  A day-end session we are calling ‘The Round-Up’ featuring a panel of fundraisers offering their thoughts on the future of fundraising

 

Whether you are a returning or first-time registrant, FD2018 promises to be the splashiest one-day conference you will attend this year!

 

On behalf of your management team who have worked hard to re-imagine FD2018, we hope you will join us by registering today!

 

Best,

John R. Farrell
Chair, Fundraising Day 2018

 

Join the Conversation – #DiveDeeperFD18

Posted by & filed under Leadership/Management, Mentorship, Next Generation Philanthropy.

The woman I am today has a lot to do with the women I’ve met throughout my life. I come from a single-mother home. I have tons of outspoken, brave, hilarious aunties. I went to a university that had a student body of largely women. I work in a sector that is largely made up of women. I am an intersectional feminist. I love being surrounded by inspiring women and have been so lucky in my short career to be mentored by some of the most incredible women out there.

I’d like to take some time to recognize how they’ve shaped me.

When I began my first professional fundraising job, I had a boss who I immediately bonded with. A single mother. A feminist. An amazing and creative fundraiser. She encouraged my ideas and pushed me to dream. Her leadership transformed me into a confident fundraiser. It is because of her encouragement that I no longer believe there is a ceiling to what I can accomplish in my career. She became one of my best friends and continues to help shape and guide both who I am as a person and who I am striving to be professionally.

My professional association (Association of Fundraising Professionals Greater Toronto Chapter) has a great mentorship program (check if your work has one and, if so, take advantage of it). When I joined, I was matched with an incredible woman who has been in the sector for over 30 years. She is a phenomenal writer and direct mail genius. Her depth of knowledge is never-ending and she is a shining example of a woman who has paved her own way, runs a successful business, and just generally kills it. When I was getting run down and stuck in a job I no longer loved, she helped me revise my resume and search for jobs – she actually found me the job I am currently in (and loving!). She taught me how to sell not just a cause, but myself. She taught me style and grace in dealing with difficult people and how to present myself for success in all things.

I am also constantly being led by women who have no idea that I am their protégé. I follow as many female leaders in my sector as I can on social media, attend as many workshops as possible, and take in as many drops of their wisdom as I can. The non-profit sector certainly has a long way to go when it comes to getting women into positions of power and adopting a more inclusive vision for our work. But at the same time, there is so much knowledge we can glean from those who have paved the way for us. I am inspired by the women in this sector who have fought for their dreams and for the betterment of the world.

Calling all young women:

Get a mentor. Get as many mentors as you can. Learn as much as you can. And then let’s get to work.

Calling all women who are established in their sector:

Be a mentor. Pull up the women who are behind you. Lend your wisdom and your experience. Remember that we are your legacy. And, above all: if you have privilege, use it! Help open doors for other women and do your part to bring those opportunities forward. The women around you may be facing more challenges than you, and it’s your responsibility to lift-up women of colour, trans women, and other marginalized groups. Remember – we’ve only truly reached equality if we all get there together.

Who has helped shape who you are at home and at work? Take some time today to email, call, or text them and let them know how impactful they’ve been for you.

The post was originally published on the Canadian Women’s Foundation blog.

About the Author

Deanna Codner is a creative and passionate fundraising professional. She is energized when bringing donors, new and old, alongside the non-profit sector’s mission to solve our society’s greatest systemic issues and prioritizes inclusion in her day-to-day work. In her spare time, you can find Deanna drinking Caesars at the cottage,or dancing around to musicals in her apartment.

 

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Analytics, Donor Centric, Metrics.

Who’s giving to charity in Canada today? How do we give? Are we as generous today as we were 30 years ago? Why do we give? And what stops us from giving?

Thanks to a deep dive that was recently undertaken by Imagine Canada into the giving patterns of Canadians, we now have a more in-depth understanding of the answers to those questions than ever before.

As part of its Giving Behaviour Project, Canada’s Rideau Hall Foundation asked Imagine Canada to mine and analyze all publicly available data sources on Canadians’ giving habits from 1984 to 2014[1], the result of which is the most comprehensive long-range picture of individual giving in Canada that has ever been compiled.

 

Canadians Continue to be Generous
Canadians have long demonstrated a strong sense of generosity, and that spirit of giving continues to be evident. Total receipted donations rose from $3.8 billion in 1984 to $9.6 billion in 2014. When unreceipted donations are included, Imagine Canada estimates that giving by individual Canadians totaled $14.3 billion in 2014.

“These numbers indicate that Canadians continue to express generosity through the medium of charitable giving in a meaningful and robust way,” says Bruce MacDonald, president and CEO of Imagine Canada.

 

Fewer Donors, Older, More Affluent and Increasingly Female
While Canadians’ generosity continues to be evident, Imagine Canada did find that the makeup of the Canadian donor base is changing, and in 2014, it is best described as smaller, older, more affluent and increasingly female compared to what it was in 1984.

Their analysis highlighted that charities are increasingly reliant on fewer donors, as the proportion of Canadian tax filers claiming donations has declined from a peak of almost 30 percent in 1990 to 21 percent in 2014.

And if you delve into those numbers, there are further, and in some cases troubling, nuances, including the aging of the donor base. “Back in 1984, the percentage of donations coming from people who were 50 and over was about 54 percent,” notes MacDonald. “By 2014, that had jumped to 74 percent.”

The most elderly group (those aged 70 and over) alone accounted for 31 percent of donations, up from 16 percent. At the other end of the spectrum, donors under 40 accounted for almost 50 percent of donors in 1984 but dropped to about 35 percent in 2014. Even more striking is the drop in donation value among the under 40 population. In 1984, donations from this group represented 26 percent of donations in 1984, while only 11 percent in 2014.

Imagine Canada also found that the donor base is becoming increasingly more affluent. In 1984, the top one percent of tax filers (then earning $80,000 and up) accounted for only 16 percent of donations, whereas by 2014, the top one percent (those earning $250,000 and up) accounted for 31 percent of donations.

The final factor of note is the growing importance of women. Donations from women make up a significantly larger proportion of total donations, up from 36 percent in 1984 to 41 percent in 2014.

 

Giving by Cause and Method[2]
Religious organizations continue to receive the largest amount of charitable donations, with two of every five dollars donated being directed to them. They also have the largest donation rate, with 41 percent of donors indicating they make gifts to these types of charities. Health-related charities come in second, attracting 13 percent of donations, followed by social services and international development (12 percent and 10 percent respectively). Hospitals rank fifth, attracting just over four percent of donations.

Perhaps not surprisingly, there are significant differences in interest in particular causes based on demographics. Older donors are much more likely to give to hospitals, with 22 percent of donors aged 65 and older giving making gifts to hospitals compared with only five percent of donors under age 35.

In terms of giving method, again not surprisingly, there are generational differences, with older donors are much more likely to give through the mail. Among donors aged 65 and up, more than 43 percent make their gifts through the mail compared with only 17 percent among the under-65 cohort.  When it comes to online giving, the story is reversed, with less than 6 percent of donors aged 65 and up giving online, compared with 14 percent of those under 65.

 

Willingness to Give More
One encouraging finding was the healthy number of donors who indicate a willingness to give more. Imagine Canada found that 25 percent of donors who make gifts to charity indicate that while they are happy with what they give, they could give more. “This finding should provide great hope for organizations as they will certainly be connected to some donors who fall into this category,” says MacDonald. “We found that these people tended to be older, have higher incomes and are more likely to be men, which can provide some further direction for charities related to who to look for.”

MacDonald goes on to say they believe that improved communication of impact could be key to unlocking the greater giving potential of this group of donors. “When we were talking with our researchers about these donors, there was a feeling that this group might be receptive to more messages about impact, going to them with quantitative, quantifiable data that talks about where their donation went and the difference that it made in the community.”

Not only do these insights from Imagine Canada’s research help to clarify the state of Canada’s giving landscape, they can also help charities to plan their future fundraising programs.  And in planning those futures, it’s critical to take a balanced approach.

“I think there is lots of opportunity in the short term to focus on those committed donors who can give more,” says MacDonald. “But as this group is becoming increasingly older, it’s going to be critical for the future sustainability of organizations that they also work diligently to attract new donors from groups who are not yet showing the same level of philanthropy as those most engaged donors. So, whether it’s new strategies to appeal to young people, leveraging the growing involvement of women as donors or taking advantage of new donation instruments like online or digital based giving, building future donors is going to be essential.”

For more information on Imagine Canada’s report, please visit the Rideau Hall Foundation website. And to hear an interview with Bruce MacDonald about the research and its findings, check out this episode of The Ask, KCI’s monthly podcast that explores issues and topics related to the future of fundraising in Canada.

 

About the Author

Nicole Nakoneshny is a Senior Vice President and Partner at KCI, Canada’s largest consulting firm focused exclusively on the non-profit sector. As part of the firm’s commitment to advancing philanthropy, Nicole leads KCI’s Thought Leadership activities by curating the knowledge that it generates through its various practices and also keeps an eye on the key and emerging trends in fundraising and philanthropy in Canada and around the world…translating that knowledge and information into useful insights for charities and fundraisers. She serves as Editor of KCI’s online publication, Philanthropic Trends Quarterly and Host of its monthly podcast, The Ask.

 

[1] 2014 was the most recent year available at the time the research was undertaken.

[2] Data in this section and Willingness to Give More based on 2013 Survey of Giving, Volunteering and Participating

Posted by & filed under Speakers, Special Events.

The night featured seven new storytellers and had an unprecedented turnout (over one-hundred listeners!)

I had the good fortune of joining this project on the ground floor. My president at Stephen Thomas Ltd, Paula Attfield, introduced me to this brand-new committee and provided my credentials for working at various nonprofit mixers and conferences in the past. The Speaker Discovery Series (or, as the cool kids say, SDS) was the brainchild of Laura Champion – Fundraising Strategist at fellow agency Blakely Inc.

Laura saw that a few rungs were missing on the ladder to the speaking circuit in fundraising and nonprofit marketing. A lot of untapped talent was just waiting for an opportunity to hit the stage, share a story, and build their portfolio as presenters. The plan was simply to give new speakers that audience and provide a few coaches for valuable professional feedback.

But what Laura didn’t know was just how successful her idea would become.

The first night of this series took place in July of 2017 and it was a marvelous proof of concept – we were proud to see nearly fifty people attend and thoroughly enjoy the night. It was fresh, they’d say. Grassroots, candid, offbeat. And they couldn’t wait to attend another.

Our committee regrouped and began planning. We wanted each event to have a theme and decided our second night would encourage people to share ‘Whoops’ stories from their fundraising careers. Pobody’s nerfect. And we wanted to celebrate that fact.

It was a fitting theme choice because numerous mistakes and surprises were ahead of us. A confirmed speaker ended up having a conflict; there was a miscommunication with our venue and they ended up cancelling our reservation; one of our coaches caught the flu and cancelled at the last minute; and finally, one of our committee members ended up having to drop out. Life happens. I’m sure you can relate. Best-laid plans, and all of that.

Somehow everything still fell into place… New volunteers stepped up, we continued to promote and fine-tune the event, and (to our amazement) it was going to be more than twice as popular as our first night of the series.

Yes, over a hundred people filled our space. Our new venue, the Gladstone hotel, provided a room that delightfully resembled a swank comedy club. Our speakers got a stage with a bare-brick backdrop and rows of theatre-style seats filled with peers, colleagues, and new friends. A few stories earned an uproar of laughter and others compelled misty-eyed contemplation. And, as a committee member, I opened the night for our speakers with an ice-breaker story about when data goes hilariously wrong.

This evening was such a hit, in fact, that you may hear about other Speaker Discovery Series starting up at other AFP chapters across Canada. I’m proud to be on this pioneering committee alongside Sam Barr, Jess Wroblewski, Yunis Kariuki, Dela Kumapley, and our champion Laura who invited us all along with her.

Our next event is May 9th so mark your calendars now. Stay tuned for other details. If you missed the first two nights of this series, you can file that under ‘Whoops’ and we will hope to see you next time. And if you do want to catch up, you’ll be pleased to hear that we recorded a podcast of the big night and you can listen to it here.

Interested in speaking? The Call for Speakers will be coming soon.  If you are nervous about submitting – please reach out, as we’re always happy to have a chat.

 

Scott Jeffries
Stephen Thomas Ltd.

Scott is a senior manager specialized in data brokerage at Stephen Thomas Ltd. He is also on the committee responsible for the annual Digital Leap conference. While Scott’s background was originally book publishing – with a specialization in sales & marketing – he has redirected his passion into a unique career using analytics and tenacity to connect charities with their ideal prospective donor audience. In his free time, Scott runs a monthly discussion group for science and philosophy enthusiasts. And he’s a donor to (or participant in) every charity walk that’s brought to his attention.

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Announcement, Government Relations, Leadership/Management.

Originally posted February 20, 2018 on the Imagine Canada blog by Bruce MacDonald.

 

Dear Prime Minister:

I am writing on behalf of the charitable and nonprofit sector, at the mid-point of your government’s mandate, to share my thoughts on the progress that has – and has not – been made on several important mandate letter commitments. As Imagine Canada is the national umbrella for the sector, my comments focus on issues and commitments that affect the sector as a whole, as opposed to those that relate to the missions of particular organizations or subsectors.

Several mandate letters contain commitments of broad applicability to our sector, including the mandate letters issued to the Ministers of Employment, Labour and Workforce Development; Families, Children and Social Development; Finance; National Revenue; Innovation, Science and Economic Development; Justice; National Revenue; Public Services and Procurement; and the President of the Treasury Board. As many mandate letter commitments overlap, they are organized thematically below.

 

Legal and regulatory reform

The mandate letters to the Ministers of Finance, National Revenue, and Justice all made reference to modernizing the regulatory and legal frameworks that govern charities and nonprofits more broadly.

The process of legal and regulatory reform is important for many reasons. Limits on charities and nonprofits income-generating and investment activities have been identified as a potentially significant hurdle in implementing a social finance and social innovation agenda; organizations that want to participate as partners or funders may find themselves prevented from doing so. As another example, the rules on the ‘direction and control’ of charities’ resources reinforce an outdated, paternalistic approach to working with communities in Canada and abroad that is at odds with the government’s own approach to, for example, international development partnerships. The 17th century framework under which we operate needs to be re-examined in light of 21st century realities.

We were very encouraged that the mandate letters seemed to open the door for a conversation on fundamental and meaningful modernization. We were also very pleased when the Minister of National Revenue appointed an advisory panel to hold consultations on political activity and other regulatory issues charities might choose to raise. We strongly support the advisory panel’s recommendations pertaining both to political activity and broader legal and regulatory reform.

We are very concerned, however, that almost a year after the advisory panel reported to the Minister of National Revenue, there has been no formal response from your government to the recommendations specific to political activity, nor has there been any indication of a process to examine the broader modernization question. There is a real risk that the momentum and goodwill generated by the advisory panel process will be lost. We would welcome a clear indication as to when the government intends to respond to the advisory panel and move forward with its commitments in this area.

We note with great interest and enthusiasm that the Senate has voted to form a special committee with a mandate to study the effect of laws, regulations, and policies on charities and nonprofits, as well as the sector’s broader impact. We trust that a government response specific to political activity will be forthcoming before then, but we believe the Senate process will provide a forum to begin exploring some of the larger issues. We encourage the government to acknowledge the Senate’s undertaking and to indicate the government’s readiness to act where possible on recommendations made by the special committee.

 

Data

The Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development was asked to improve the quality of publicly available data.

As you may be aware, Statistics Canada no longer generates or disseminates data about the charitable and nonprofit sector as a whole. Previous data products, such as the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, and the Satellite Account of Nonprofit Institutions and Volunteering, gave us crucial information about the sector and its economic and employment impact. The most recent available data indicates charities and nonprofits generate more than 8 percent of GDP and employ two million Canadians. These data, however, are now more than a decade old.

We have been in discussions with Statistics Canada and the Minister’s office as to how this situation can be rectified. Canada was once a world leader in generating information and data about this sector and we hope it can be again. The commitments your government has made in the policy areas included in this letter make it imperative that we have current, good quality information about the sector. There appears to be recognition of the importance of this issue, but no urgency to find the resources required to collect the relevant data.

 

Grants and contributions

You asked the President of the Treasury Board to encourage departments to devote a fixed percentage of program funds to experimenting with new approaches to existing problems and measuring the impact of such efforts.

We are pleased that Treasury Board has provided flexibility for increased experimentation by departments. We hope departments will take advantage of this flexibility and that Treasury Board will collect and share information about how this policy has been put into action.

You also emphasized the importance of evaluation in asking the President of the Treasury Board to work towards a “strengthened culture of measurement, evaluation, and innovation in program and policy design and delivery.” There is a potential stumbling block here as impact evaluation and measurement are too often not treated as allowable costs in grant and contribution agreements. Furthermore, the overall administration of grants and contributions – which is too often short-term, focuses on outputs rather than outcomes, and risk-averse – limits the extent to which innovation can occur. We understand Treasury Board is reviewing its policies on transfer payments and we encourage your government to ensure that grants and contributions are administered in such a way that they encourage innovation.

 

Social Finance and Social Innovation

The Minister of Families, Children and Social Development, and Employment, Labour and Workforce Development were tasked with developing a Social Innovation and Social Finance strategy. The Minister of National Revenue was also asked to assist in this process.

We are pleased a Social Innovation and Social Finance Steering Group, supported by Employment and Social Development Canada, was appointed last summer and has undertaken a consultation process. Although we recognize that several Steering Group members have an understanding of the charitable and nonprofit sector, we are disappointed the sector is not directly represented in the membership of the Steering Group. Nevertheless, Imagine Canada submitted a brief and recommendations to the Steering Group and participated in consultation sessions, and we know other charities and nonprofits have also done so.

We understand the Steering Group will likely report this summer and we look forward to seeing its recommendations. We trust that the government will give serious thought as to how it can properly invest in and resource the Strategy in order to stimulate innovation within the sector. We believe that a whole-of-government approach will likely be required.

 

Procurement

The Minister of Public Services and Procurement was mandated with modernizing the federal procurement system in such a way as to help achieve a number of government priorities, including social procurement.

We are pleased Public Services and Procurement Canada has begun to consult on how social procurement might be embedded in a range of government procurement activities. While it is still early in the process, we hope significant progress can be made towards this goal.

We are also hopeful Bill C-344 will be adopted. Where they have been used, community benefit agreements have proven an effective way of achieving multiple benefits through public expenditure without increasing procurement costs.

 

Youth employment

The Minister of Employment, Labour and Workforce Development was mandated to “[i]ncrease the number of good quality, permanent jobs for younger workers,” in part by increasing investment in the Youth Employment Strategy and improving its impact.

Charities and nonprofits are significant employers of young Canadians. Any reforms to the government’s youth employment initiatives will, we hope, recognize this fact and ensure charities and nonprofits are not disadvantaged. We are very pleased the Expert Panel on Youth Employment recognized that charities and nonprofits should be part of any program or policy design – not just from the perspective of providing services to youth, but from the perspective of being major employers of youth. Members of Imagine Canada’s policy working group on youth employment in the sector have been asked to participate in consultations with the Minister of Employment, Labour and Workforce Development. We hope this marks a commitment to seeking input from all sectors as economic and employment policies are considered.

We are all dedicated to strengthening the economic and social prospects of the communities we serve. Charities and nonprofits are eager to continue working with you and your government to improve the framework under which we operate so that we can build on our existing impact and contribution.

 

We appreciate your consideration of the issues raised here, and look forward to hearing your thoughts.

 

Yours truly,

Bruce MacDonald

President & CEO
Imagine Canada