Posted by & filed under Donor communications, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

By Freddie Tubbs

 

How you ask for donations often makes a big difference. You are asking people to donate their money and you have to be compelling when doing this. You also have to be transparent.

Asking in person is difficult, but what may be even harder is writing effective fundraising e-mails. You only get that one chance to make a good online impression and to ask for a donation from your potential donor. There isn’t much space either so you have to be concise.

Here are just a few tips on how to write effective fundraising e-mails:

 

Tell a good story

In order to get the emotional response you want, you have to tell a really interesting story. Of course, it has to be relevant to your cause. Start your e-mail with a few sentences describing the problem at hand, but in a way that will immerse readers. You’ll probably have to rewrite this section a few times, but it will be worth it when it comes to getting readers to take the next actionable step.

Another thing you should do is be as specific as possible. This means adding real numbers and percentages into your story to make it even more realistic and compelling.

 

Make it short

Your fundraising e-mail can’t be long. You need to say what you have to say quickly, without flowery prose or elaborating the issue for too long. Dedicate the first few sentences to telling your story, another few sentences to what is being done at the moment to help the cause, and a few more to explain where the money is going. Then, finish strong with a polite, yet compelling call to action. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Congress, Mentorship, Networking, Next Generation Philanthropy, Opinion, Special Events.

With Congress a little over a month away and the latest AFP Speaker Discovery Series (Special Pre-Congress Edition!) just around the corner, let’s talk speaking!

 

Every industry has speakers who are a staple within the events circuit, familiar figures on the conference stage; but what happens when the industry changes? Or those speakers start to retire? This year has seen a number of speakers new to the non-profit world or, in fact, new to speaking altogether take the stage – and this is in no small part due to the launch of the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter’s Speaker Discovery Series (SDS).

 

Recently, Laura Champion, Chair of the Education Committee for Congress 2018 and Founder and Chair of the AFP Speaker Discovery Series, sat down with Mo Waja, one of our Congress 2018 Speakers, on the Let’s Talk Speaking podcast to discuss what speaking looks like in the non-profit sector, discovering new speaking talent, and how organizations within and beyond the non-profit industry can begin building their next generation of speakers.

 

Check out the episode below as well as on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, and Stitcher, and don’t forget to buy your tickets for the next SDS – Special Pre-Congress edition happening on October 24!* 

 

 

*This edition of the Speaker Discovery Series is free for Congress delegates!

Learn more about our 2018 Congress sessions, speakers, and register here.

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Case Study, Donor Centric, Ethics, Next Generation Philanthropy, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Originally published on Imagine Canada October 1, 2018.

This summer, I had the privilege of working as the Behavioural Insights Assistant with the Strategic Communications and Research & Evaluation teams at Imagine Canada. We are currently exploring the meaning, influences on, and importance of trust in charities.

I started the summer with curiosity and the desire to further unravel this mysterious concept. As many academics do, I started my search for answers by collecting hundreds of academic articles on the topic. It soon became clear that there isn’t a single unified definition of trust that captures the concept. In fact, a vast majority of articles commented on this lack of cohesion or an agreed upon definition within the literature.

As a thought leader in the charitable sector, Imagine Canada is working on a Trust Project in an effort to better understand the concept and to make it accessible to charity leaders, so they can in turn, work on increasing their trustworthiness with the public and other stakeholders. I invite you to think about how trust impacts your organization and your mission. Here are some key insights from the literature so far. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Announcement.

Advancing Philanthropy – October 2018

 

Read the New Issue

Search Past Digital Issues

Go Green, Go Digital! Update Your AP Profile to Receive Digital Only

Update AP Profile to Get Hardcopy Version

Halloween is on the horizon and pranksters are suiting up as Wonder Woman, Batman, you name it. But superheroes are also a central feature of our October issue—fundraising professionals like you who overcome challenges, conquer fears, and improve lives. Our October issue also shines a light on philanthropy in small towns and rural areas and shortcomings in America’s charitable system. There is work to be done!

To read the new digital issue of Advancing Philanthropy, simply click here!

What does the digital magazine offer? Briefly, you can:

  • email articles;
  • search the entire magazine and archived issues (back to October 2007—just click on the “Archives” tab) by author or key word;
  • link directly to additional resources from each article;
  • save your digital copy as a PDF; and
  • connect instantly to advertisers and resource partners!

To manage whether you receive the print or digital Advancing Philanthropy, simply visit the “MyAFP ProfileMember Gateway” page (www.afpnet.org/MyProfile) on the AFP website.

Members outside the United States and Canada automatically have access to the digital edition of the magazine and may select to receive the print magazine if they wish. Collegiate, Global, Young Professional and Small Organizational members automatically receive the digital magazine only.

For additional information or if you have comments, please contact me at sswift@afpnet.org.

Sincerely,

Susan Drake Swift
Editor, Advancing Philanthropy

 

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

In honour of National Philanthropy Day on November 15, AFP is proud to offer a $50 discount to new members joining in the Professional and Associate Member categories starting today through until November 30, 2018. The discount applies to the $50 off the International portion of the dues. Fill out the membership invitation as usual, but deduct $50 from the total and be sure to include the following coupon with your payment. *Coupon must be included with payment in order to take advantage of this offer.

To join online, please visit the AFP International website and use promo code NPD2018. Please note that only one coupon can be used per new member. Offer expires November 30, 2018.

For more information, please contact the AFP International Membership Department at 1-800-666-3863.

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Congress, Inspiration, Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications, Opinion.

From November 19-21, 2018, hone your skills, exchange ideas, harness new technologies and build your network at #AFPCongress2018. This is the fundraising event of the year – not to be missed!

Want to come to Congress, but need some help in getting your boss on board with the idea? We’ve got you covered.

The basics:

  • Congress is a three-day conference unlike any other with more than 90 sessions to choose from that explore all areas of philanthropy – whether you’re new to the fundraising profession, are an industry veteran, or somewhere in between, Congress has something for everyone
  • Congress is the largest fundraising conference in Canada that welcomes more than 1,000 delegates from across North America each year
  • Congress is the best way to upgrade your skills and knowledge, network and connect with other like-minded professionals

 

What’s in it for them:

  • New ideas that you’ll bring back to the office to help your organization grow their programs, maximize their impact and results
  • Solutions that you’ll share on some of the sector’s top challenges
  • The ability to stay ahead of the curve – you’ll share new ideas on sector innovations and technologies that will help your organization thrive
  • An “in” with key funding decision-makers and business leaders – you’ll be able to make the proper introductions after all your networking at Congress

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Donor communications, Inspiration, Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications.

By Mo Waja

With AFP Congress arriving in a short 2 months, burgeoning and tenured thought leaders alike are preparing themselves and their talks to bring new, ambitious, and exciting ideas to the world of fundraising. But ‘thought leadership’ as a marketing activity isn’t something done just once a year or even once a month. It is not exclusive to large scale speaking events or even to a single guest blog post. Thought leadership as an activity or, more accurately, as a result is something that individuals and organizations commit to as a regular piece of their marketing mix.

 

Now, the idea of thought leadership is not new. In fact, ‘thought leadership’ as a marketing strategy has been in vogue for a number of years now. The challenge is that many individuals and organizations, particularly smaller organizations, can find the concept of taking on thought leadership daunting, particularly in the face of many larger organizations or more tenured leaders out there leveraging their much more developed content machines to pump out a near-continuous stream of articles, interviews, blogs, podcasts, and talks.

 

The first step is to recognize that ‘thought leadership’ or becoming a ‘thought leader’ is not a strategy. It’s not even a tactic. It is the result of consistent, quality content that is useful to your audience. To become a thought leader and create thought leadership content is to become an authority on a certain subject, within a certain field. Just as not everyone who picks up an instrument is a musician, not everyone who puts fingers to keyboard (feet to stage, voice to podcast, etc.) is a thought leader.

 

Thought leadership is something that must be established, not simply done. While one talk, interview, or piece of writing might put you on the map – it’s the cumulative work, experience, and expertise that brought you there that builds your foundation as a thought leader. For an organization seeking to become a thought leader in their industry, that becomes the collective work, experience, and expertise of all of your contributors. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Career Development, Case Study, Next Generation Philanthropy, Speakers, Special Events.

Originally published on the Hlborn: Charity eNews September 4, 2018.

By Scott Jeffries

The Greater Toronto Chapter of AFP has been conducting a youth engagement and professional development experiment over the past year. The Speaker Discovery Series (SDS) was originally created to address a need in the GTA: many fundraisers could not get speaking experience because most events or conferences require you to have experience speaking at events or conferences.

The committee believed there was a great deal of untapped talent out there – and the plan was simply to host a night where a few inexperienced speakers (six or so) could present to a supportive audience, receive a score with written feedback from experts, and use our event on their future applications in the speaking circuit.

It quickly became more successful than expected.

The first event had a modest attendance of 30 or so people, and the events since attracted between 75 and 100 attendees each. Speakers are proudly saying they hailed from “season one” or “season two” of SDS. A genuine loyalty is developing, offers to join or contribute keep coming, and everyone is asking when the next SDS night will be. And other chapters of AFP are showing interest in starting their very own SDS program.

The fledgling event series has become one of this chapter’s most popular activities. Did this success come entirely from the need of new speakers to build their portfolios? The committee – which now includes me (Scott Jeffries), Laura Champion, Sam Barr, Yunis Kariuki, and Jessica Wroblewski – has a different theory. We think something else is happening. Read more »