Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Fundraising, Government Relations, Inspiration, Leadership/Management, Volunteers.

Thank you to our members who participated in our annual Day in the Ridings (DITR) initiative! Our members’ efforts were key in creating awareness of the role and value of professional fundraising to our federal government.

 

Over the past two years, 140 AFP members met with 164 MPs, Ministers, and government officials in 338 ridings across Canada to bring forward our “case” for AFP’s role in public policy development and asked elected officials to support three important policy priorities:

  1. A home in government for the charitable sector;
  2. an ongoing investment in data collection on the charitable sector; and
  3. consideration of tax exemption for gifts of private shares and real estate.

 

Thanks to this work, AFP’s message about the value of professional fundraising and the importance of an enabling environment for charities has spread across the country and across party lines. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Board of Directors, Inspiration, Leadership/Management, Volunteers.

Originally published on AFP Global

 

What questions does Juniper Locilento, senior director, development at the YMCA of Greater Toronto ask herself as she heads into work every day?

When Juniper Locilento appeared before the Senate Committee on the Charitable Sector in her capacity as VP of Public Affairs for the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter on March 18, 2019, her five-minute submission summarized the most foundational pillar of fundraising.

“There is a well-documented connection between asking for, and securing, charitable contributions,” she told the committee. “The power of the ask has been demonstrated in experimental studies. Asking not only increases the probability of donating but also the amount that people give.”

She quoted the AFP Foundation for Philanthropy – Canada’s own biennial study, What Canadian Donors Want, which found 75% of people specifically asked to give will do so, compared to 53% of those who are not asked. That 22% differential represents hundreds of millions of incremental revenues that could enable charities to better address urgent need.

Fundraisers play a vital link between charities and their supporters, Juniper argued, and while Canadians acknowledge fundraising is important, they also have concerns. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Volunteers.

 

Born in Kitchener-Waterloo, Mr. Gordon H. Durnan grew up in a family with a passion for community service. In 1977, Mr. Durnan began his career in healthcare philanthropy as the first managing Director of the newly formed York Central Hospital Foundation in Richmond Hill, Ontario. He joined the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) and the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy (AHP) and for a few years, he served as the only Canadian director on each organization’s Board. He also became one of the first Canadians to receive the Certified Fund Raising Executive (CFRE) designation from AFP, and the first to receive the Fellow (FAHP) designation from AHP.

After ten years with York Central, Gord and his family relocated to Muskoka, where he began his new position as the Managing Director of the South Muskoka Foundation until his retirement in 2005. In his active retirement, Gord has served on multiple boards, including the Sandra Schmirler Foundation and the Board of Community Foundations of Canada. He served as the Founder and Vice-Chair of the Muskoka Community Foundation, Director of the Cottage Country Family Health Team and most recently, served as the Chair of the Board of Governor’s at Nipissing University from 2017-2018.

Throughout his full and rich professional career, Mr. Durnan has been honoured with the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal and the AHP’s Si Seymour Award. In 1996, he was named Fundraising Executive of the Year by AFP. Gord currently lives in Gravenhurst with his family and when he’s not volunteering, he is enjoying himself on the golf course. We’re proud to have Gord has a long-standing member and to see that he has been awarded at Nipissing University’s 2019 convocation with an honourary degree.

Posted by & filed under Fundraising Day, Networking, Next Generation Philanthropy, Opinion, Special Events.

By Emily Barrie

“Leave something behind, be curious, and surround yourself with good people”.

These are simply a few of the takeaways I left Fundraising Day 2019 with; and as a first-time attendee I can confidently say that as I boarded the Lakeshore West train I was heading back home with a number of new tools in my fundraising toolkit.

 

I am early on in my career as a professional fundraiser, and have been a member of the AFP for less than a year. Always eager to learn and improve my skill-set I decided that it was time for me dig deeper and dive into my fundraising education. So naturally I found myself on AFP Toronto’s Fundraising Day 2019 website, hovering over the “complete registration” button. At first I was a bit hesitant as not only would I not know anyone, this would be the first time I’ve attended an event like this. Of course, I could hear the little fundraiser voice in the back of my head saying “you won’t know unless you ask”, or in this case, attend. So after debating over which sessions I wanted to participate in I found myself looking at that same registration button, and clicked.

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Diversity, Donor communications, Fundraising Day, Next Generation Philanthropy, Opinion.

By Loretta Lam

Understand Your Audience Before You Ask

 

May 30, 2019 – I was at a conference today filled with around 500 attendees from small to large not-for profit organizations. The conference, called Fundraising Day and appropriately themed “The Fabric of Fundraising” in celebration of its 25th year, was organized by the Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) Greater Toronto Chapter. I made remarks at one of the sessions at the conference about the importance for fundraisers to understand the changing fabric of Canada.

Canada now has over 40,000 immigrants every year and 7.1 million Canadians’ mother tongue is neither English nor French. By 2036, 34% of Canadians will be multicultural consumers. Charities and not-for-profit organizations have to understand that their current and future donations, sponsorships, volunteers and employees will come from these immigrants. Fundraisers need to adapt their fundraising and marketing strategies to the fast changing demographics. With that being said, I wonder how many of them have hit some roadblocks along the way before they realized they need a different approach to this unique audience segment.

The Chinese, for example, are known for their charitable giving and generosity, but they are not keen to give just because you have a good cause. With so many good causes, how can you push the right buttons to get results? Many organizations make the mistake of asking before the right relationships have been built. From my own personal history and experience, I have learned that doing business with the Chinese requires building positive relationships and trust. This same principle applies to fundraising in the Chinese community (and in the sector at large). While immigrant Chinese are trying to integrate into the Canadian culture, it is important to keep in mind that most were brought up with a very different set of values, which still shape how they think and behave.

So, how do we embrace these values and diversity in our fundraising?

 

 Here are 6 quick tips to get you started:

 

Read more »

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Next Generation Philanthropy, Philanthropy Awards, Special Events, Volunteers.

We are fortunate to work with outstanding volunteer leaders, donors, organizations, corporations and professionals in advancing the important work of charities each day. Every year, at our Philanthropy Awards presentations, we honour and celebrate the incredible contributions of time, leadership and financial support made by organizations and individuals who inspire generosity and giving.

The 2019 AFP Greater Toronto Chapter Philanthropy Awards Luncheon will be held in conjunction with Congress on Wednesday, November 27, at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre in Toronto.

We are proactively encouraging applications from qualified candidates who demonstrate a strong commitment to inclusion and reflect the wonderful diversity of our city and region. The AFP Greater Toronto Chapter Philanthropy Award categories are (click download to save entries in application forms):

Nominators: Must be AFP Greater Toronto Chapter members.

Nominees: Fundraising Professional category nominees must be AFP members. Nominees in other categories are not required to be AFP members. Self-nominations are welcome.

The deadline for submissions is Friday, August 2 at 5:00 PM EST.

For more information, please contact Cynthia Quigley at cquigley@afptoronto.org / 416-941-9212.

Thank you for making this a priority and we look forward to honouring and celebrating our best with you. Submit your nomination today!

Sincerely,

Caroline Riseboro
AFP Greater Toronto Chapter President
Chair, Philanthropy Awards Selection Committee

 

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Career Development, Next Generation Philanthropy, Philanthropy Awards.

 

The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) Greater Toronto Chapter is proud to announce Kirstin Ling of Toronto General & Western Hospital Foundation (TGWHF) as the recipient of the 2019 New Fundraising Professional Award.

Described by peers as a passionate and motivated young professional who is driven by the opportunity to serve her community, Kirstin has made an impact early on in her career.  As a Principal Gift Manager at TGWHF, Kirstin is the campaign lead for Emergency, Nephrology, Hematology, Otolaryngology, Nursing and Health Professions portfolios. She is currently overseeing the Emergency Department’s campaign to raise $25M at the Toronto General Hospital to transform emergency care by providing a space focused on patient experience to provide exceptional and compassionate care.

Inspired by a personal experience as the primary caretaker for her father, Kirstin made the decision to transition from working in youth-focused international development organizations to healthcare. Born and raised in Toronto, within the Sunnybrook catchment area, she raised more than $2M for Sunnybrook Foundation prior to joining TGWHF. This includes the creation of funds for Brain Sciences Research Students and Complex Malignant Haematology. Read more »

Posted by & filed under Fundraising Day, Next Generation Philanthropy, Opinion, Special Events.

Where were you in 1994?

Ann Rosenfield shares her thoughts on how the sector has changed over the past 25 years…

 

You’ve come a long way, baby. Maybe.

“Let’s face it. Women are not major donors.” said the head of fundraising in my first  job in 1994. Some things have sure improved since then while other areas are the same, or worse. In honour of this year’s Fundraising Day throwback theme, here’s what’s what in our profession then and now.

 

Same as it ever was, same as it ever was

What’s with us fundraisers and planned giving? In 1994, fundraisers were always trying to carve out some time for planned giving with limited success. The same issue still seems true today. As a sector, we still seem to think this is something to focus on tomorrow, tomorrow, tomorrow. This short-sighted approach is part of a continuing problem with an over-emphasis on immediate revenue over long-term growth and stability.

Meanwhile direct mail has proved the doomsayers wrong! Back in 1994, you would have heard all kinds of workshops on how direct mail was going to disappear. While mail has changed with the times, paper letters in paper envelopes are still an important part of a fundraising strategy.

 

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

In 1994 all jobs were permanent, full-time positions with benefits and pensions. The rise of contract employment has meant that young professionals (and even senior leaders) find themselves in unstable employment today. This is bad for us as professionals and bad for the field. In a sector that is supposed to provide solutions to social problems, it is inexcusable that an increasing segment of our employees can’t enjoy stable, secure employment with benefits. Read more »