Posted by & filed under Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Siobhan Aspinall, CFRE
Senior Manager, Major Gifts, Junior Achievement of British Columbia

At Congress this year, I’m going to talk about involving non-fundraising staff in donor stewardship. You’d be crazy not to! So let’s think about who to take on that next donor visit and how to make them successful.

In the past, I was guilty of defaulting to the chiefs. I’d automatically bring along a board member, maybe even the chair or my CEO.

But if donor stewardship is about showing people the impact of their gift, then why not go straight to the source and bring along a person who actually delivers your programs? They might not be as polished as the CEO, but I bet they’ll be more interesting – mainly because they are so much closer to the work.

Don’t get me wrong – I know this approach can backfire. There’s maybe a very good reason that we don’t often invite the programs team along for sensitive visits as you can’t possibly prep them for every question or comment that might come up. However, I think it’s worthwhile to try. Start with these tips to set up your colleague for success on a donor visit:

  1. Book your program colleague for an informal briefing a couple
    of days before the donor meeting.12177981144_bd277b7ea4
  2. Tell them about the donor – how much they’ve given, what their interests are, and above all, what kind of personality they have.
  3. Emphasize more than once that the visit is informal and that we’re not going to ask for money.
  4. Do a bit of a role play. The fundraiser should start, as she has the relationship. Then let the donor talk, then cue up the program person.
  5. Have a signal for your colleague to let them know when they’ve said enough on a given topic. Let them know this is
    necessary because it is SO important to let the donor talk too. (I had a system with one scientist where I’d put my pen down on the table. He stopped so abruptly the first time we did it, it was like someone had punched him in the neck. We improved over time!)
  6. Figure out a “leave.” What’s the follow up we will offer when we close the meeting? An advance look at a pending report? A promise to send along an event invitation? Make sure it’s never just “goodbye.”
  7. Write a thank you for your program colleague to send from her email address (with you cc’ed) encouraging the donor to get in touch directly with any questions or comments. This creates a nice value add where you’re giving your best supporters exclusive access to the change-makers of the organization.

And don’t forget to tell your colleagues why this is so important. At the end of it all, we are looking to secure more funds for their work!
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Siobhan has been fundraising for over 15 years for organizations including the Canadian Cancer Society, the David Suzuki Foundation and United Way. She is currently the Senior Manager of Development at Junior Achievement working primarily in grant-writing and major gifts. She teaches fundraising courses at BCIT, consults, and is a board member for the Association of Fundraising Professionals. She holds a BA in from UBC and an Associate Certificate in Fundraising Management from BCIT. She writes for her fundraising blog at siobhanaspinall.com and surfs in Tofino. Siobhan will be presenting at Congress 2014 in Toronto.

Posted by & filed under Major/Planned Gifts, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

David Kravinchuk

Chief Advice Dispenser, Fundraising Pharmacy

There is one powerfully simple way you can instantly begin creating healthy, effective and rewarding long-term donor relationships:

Ensure your donors can easily find the name, phone number and email address of a real live person that can help them with an enquiry, complaint, compliment or even a donation. Then invite them to use this information.  Invite them to call, email or pop by. For any reason.

Does your charity direct donors to call a toll-free or auto-attendant line instead of a real person who can help?  Or do you invite donors to email info@charitymeh.com on your Planned Giving webpages?  If so, this is what you are really saying to donors desperately trying to connect to a human being at your organization.

Does your charity direct donors to call a toll-free or auto-attendant line instead of a real person who can help? Or do you invite donors to email info@charitymeh.com on your Planned Giving webpages? If so, this is what you are really saying to donors desperately trying to connect to a human being at your organization.

Next, make sure this information is everywhere your donors’ eyes are… thank you letters, direct mail reply/donation forms, annual report, newsletter, brochures and on every single page of your website.

Why?

  • Donors won’t just figure it out.
  • It speaks volumes that your organization is thoughtful and takes donor relationships seriously.
  • Most donors will never call, email or pop in, but there’s a comfort and trust factor knowing that they can.
  • You will create a culture shift to focus on donor needs and service.
  • You will build loyalty and loyal donors are incredibly valuable (monthly, midmost and bequest donors usually start as loyal donors).

The simplicity of this gesture belies its power. It can deliver millions to your organization long term.

Take a few minutes now and find the places you can make this change quickly and easily. Then take a few more minutes tomorrow to make sure it happens. You’ll be prepared to really maximize that massive effort you’re putting into your fundraising this busy holiday season.

It’s an incredibly effective way you can show your donors the respect and love they deserve.

Passionate about prescribing annual giving and bequest marketing solutions, David opened Fundraising Pharmacy to dispense name-brand advice (at generic prices!) for Canadian charities including United Way, Big Brothers Big Sisters, The MS Society of Canada, The Sunshine Foundation of Canada and Community Living Toronto. Earlier, David was the Senior Philanthropic Counsel at Good Works where he was responsible for a legacy marketing client roster that included Red Cross, UNHCR and Canadian Cancer Society. Follow David on Twitter  @DavidKravinchuk and join his session on annual giving at Congress 2014 in Toronto.

 

Posted by & filed under Crowdfunding, Gamification, Marketing/Communications, Mobile Giving, Next Generation Philanthropy.

Angela Simo Brown – Director of Social Change Strategy and Co-founder

AIR MILES for Social Change, AIR MILES Reward Program/LoyaltyOne

Gamification is here to stay – and charities would do well to use this concept to make giving fun. It is important for charities to capitalize on our human habits and desires in order to grow donations in a shrinking donor base environment. We like games, we like our phones, and we like being winners. We also are looking for purpose and meaning and how we can make a difference. Mobile gamification for charitable causes can give us what we need.

And it doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive either. Instead of building a game from scratch, charities should look to a corporate partner to co-create the solution. One example is mobile game developer XEOPlay who created Tilt World, a game that helps to reforest Madagascar. Points earned in the game translate to tree seeds purchased for and on behalf of the tree-planting charity WeForest. XEOPlay’s goal is to plant 1 million trees in Madagascar, which is suffering from the effects of deforestation. Another example is Games for Good, who donates a fraction of a cent to charity every time you play their games. Or more simply, it can be a voting game, like Fido and Evergreen’s 2011 ‘Share Your Care’ program. Fido donated $100,000 that was divided between 20 different local environmental projects based on Canadians voting online for their favourite project.gamification

AIR MILES for Social Change has been partnering with different charities for the past 4 years by using reward miles as a carrot to increase giving and engagement with nonprofits. We infused gamification and behavioural economics motivational concepts into these initiatives with good success and have learned a lot in the process. Here is a list of top 5 lessons we’ve observed on how charities can best engage with today’s donor:

  1. People give to be personally recognized, not necessarily because they are emotionally connected to the cause: People like to be seen giving – in fact for many nowadays this is the main reason they give. They want their peers to see the good they have done, and some are defining their giving as a social measure of their personal success. So a tax receipt and thank you letter just aren’t enough anymore. Charities need to make sure that they are giving the types of recognition that people want today, and often social media recognition to the most cost-effective tool to use.
  2. People give to support their friends vs the cause more than ever: Fundraisers where donors reach out to their network have been around for years. These programs are generally more successful because people like to support their friends. The next evolution of fundraising is in driving more value from peer-to-peer donor networks. Crowdfunding is exploding. See the amazing success of pooling platforms such as Kickstarter, Indiegogo and Causevox. Charities should piggyback off of these platforms and capitalize on their popularity.
  3. People want frequent touch points of thanks and celebration for their giving: Social media has trained us all to expect frequent virtual hugs and celebration by way of badges, trophies, congratulations and thank yous. We want to be told all the time how good we are. Rightly or wrongly, these are the new table stakes and charities need to give this recognition and appreciation to their donors more frequently. The thanks and recognition can be small, fleeting, and inexpensive to deliver at a regular cadence via social media.
  4. People want experiences to be social and fun: Gamification is one way to do this, as well as events where donors can be active participants, plus consumer-led social media movements like the Ice Bucket Challenge. Although movements are a fleeting and time-limited way to fundraise, the way that people engaged with the Ice Bucket campaign is different than ever before. Making giving into a game has proven to be a great way to engage a high number of people across multiple demographics and regions, and is an emerging trend that charities can’t afford to ignore.
  5. Youth want to make a difference hands-on: Youth want to tangibly experience the difference they are making, and just making a donation to an organization to do the work for them doesn’t suffice for this cohort. They want to donate their time, energy, spirit and dollars to grassroots organizations, and the most successful programs are going to be led by youth. See the popularity of giving initiatives such as community Giving Days, or PhilanthroTeens.” In addition to the hands-on experience, youth want to be able to share their experiences with others.  Social media and games are the best way to engage the new youth donor segment.

The other key success factor is of course, mobile. People love their phones and the more they can do with their phones the more they will engage with your brand and the cause.

A megatrend of our time is that people are actively looking for new and impactful ways to make a difference. Charities offer up all the things we are looking for but they need to proactively shake up the way giving is done today. Gamification, crowdfunding and behavioural economics will be three key elements for successful, fun and rewarding giving programs of the future.

AngelaSB

Angela leads the shared value, cause marketing strategy and program development for the AIR MILES Reward Program, Canada’s premier coalition loyalty program. Under Angela’s leadership, AIR MILES has developed over 25 innovative program partnerships across the public, nonprofit and private sectors that have driven record increases in positive behavior change in healthy living, energy conservation and increased transit use. An engaging speaker, Angela has spoken at many conferences about the power of creating shared value using social change and cause marketing strategies.

Posted by & filed under Inspiration, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Gayle Goossen

President and Creative Director, Barefoot Creative

I am a storyteller.

I personally write hundreds of appeals and newsletters every year. I love crafting a fundraising offer – it is personal, attention-gripping and, yes, it can be transformational. But let me share a tiny insight – a challenge I run into almost every day.

Fundraising organizations exchange organizational information for the power of a story. I have no idea why. We know that a story engages far more centres in the brain. We know that a story invites the readers to read more. We know that stories motivate compassion and response.

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                                                   photo credit: Enokson

It seems to me fundraising organizations should be champions of storytelling.

Perhaps it comes from the misnomer that education happens in a lecture. I’m not sure who started that myth. I know that educators world-wide perpetuate it. But it is simply not true. Current studies in brain response to story affirm the power of storytelling

As a young student I attended two graduation exercises. The same speaker spoke at both of them. Idealist that I am, and the fact that there was significant overlap in the audience, I expected him to deliver 2 different speeches.

But he didn’t.

Fascinatingly, I didn’t catch on until his first story. Then, as I listened more attentively, I realized that he hadn’t bothered to change anything. I only remembered the story. It seemed to me that he would have been brilliant if he had simply replaced the story – no one would have known. The most poignant memory of his speech was the story.

The story challenges the listener or reader to link analogies, discover the journey, build the bridges between characters. Most of all, the story introduces us to people who are  like us and not like us – but just enough like us to make us interested in their lives. Listeners and readers immediately begin to solve the story’s core problems, cheering for the hero and booing the villain. The brain imagines the scene, the character, the problem and the solution.

The great storyteller begins with an innate sense of curiosity. The storyteller is on a quest to understand why and who and how and what and where. They want to understand the poignant details. (Join me at the national AFP conference…. I’ll share concrete examples there)

My husband just doesn’t get it. Seriously (but then, he’s not a story teller). When he gets off the phone with his mother – I have about 57 questions. Did he think to ask one of them? Curiosity didn’t kill the cat – it got the story. (More at the conference… )

Your depiction of the people in the story must be human – even if they live in another country, there are thousands of ways they can relate to your audience. You need to find them in your neighbourhood, down your street, in the mall… you can make them human by the way you describe them. As the longevity and universal appeal of Shakespeare has illustrated many. Many times – the human story has not changed all that much.

As a writer/fundraiser/ storyteller you tell some extremely difficult stories. That is a distinct gift. Hone it!

Gayle is the founder and president of Barefoot Creative. For more than 20 years she has been walking alongside nonprofits, helping to develop and implement fund raising strategies that inspire donors to engage and contribute. Her academic background and graduate degree in Canadian Literature and Post-Modern Critical Theory inspire a unique approach to applying foundational fund development and marketing strategies to help non-profits grow. She will be presenting at Congress 2014 in Toronto.

 

 

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

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TORONTO, ON (September 12, 2014) – The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) Greater Toronto Chapter is pleased to announce the winners of the 2014 Philanthropy Awards. The Chapter has honoured leadership in philanthropy through its annual awards program since 1995. This year’s group of extraordinary recipients will join a long list of generous Canadians. The 2014 honourees are:

  • Marcel A. Desautels, Outstanding Philanthropist
  • Bill and Susanne Holland, Outstanding Philanthropists
  • Judy Matthews, Outstanding Volunteer
  • Avon Canada, Outstanding Corporation
  • Kin Canada, Outstanding Group or Foundation
  • Sarah Jordan and Claire Jordan, Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy
  • Toronto Summer Music, Mo Davies Small Organization for Excellence in Fundraising
  • Denny Young, CFRE, Outstanding Fundraising Professional

“Philanthropy is the fabric that binds our society together. So many critically important initiatives simply would not happen without the generosity of donors and passionate volunteers. This year’s award recipients stand as an example of that,” said Susan Horvath, CFRE, Chair AFP Greater Toronto Chapter Philanthropy Awards Selection Committee. “By putting their creative ingenuity, powers of persuasion, strategic skills and generosity to work, this year’s Philanthropy Award recipients have demonstrated an outstanding commitment to our community and have empowered others to meet challenges and overcome obstacles.”

These awards celebrate the outstanding contribution of time, leadership and financial support of a special group of Canadians who set new benchmarks of excellence in the acts of giving and volunteering. The 2014 recipients will be honoured at the Philanthropy Awards Luncheon from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 26th at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre, North Building, as part of Congress 2014, the Greater Toronto Chapter’s annual conference. Please visit the Philanthropy Awards website to view award categories and past recipients.  

About the AFP

The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) was established in 1960. It represents 30,000 members in more than 232 chapters in Canada, the United States, Mexico, and China, and works to advance philanthropy through advocacy, research, education, and certification programs. The Greater Toronto Chapter was established in 1994 and is the largest chapter in the world with over 1,300 members. For more information please visit www.afptoronto.org.

Media contact: Cynthia Quigley at 416-941-9212 or cquigley@afptoronto.org.

 

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Announcement, Government Relations, Leadership/Management, Marketing/Communications.

Recently, Andrew Coyne penned this column in the National Post focused on the policing of political activities of charities. Coyne concluded that the best means of addressing the situation is to “take away the charitable tax designation—not selectively, based on their ability to dance on the head of a CRA pin, but across the board, outright.”

The Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP) finds this conclusion fundamentally flawed. The charitable tax designation and the tax credit represent a gesture of confidence on the part of the people by way of their elected representatives, an acknowledgement of the effectiveness of nonprofit and community action and a commitment to the longstanding tradition of philanthropy in Canada.

The charitable tax designation and the tax credit bind together the interests and concerns of all of us in the betterment of our society. Although donors give out of generosity, the tax credit encourages them to give more often and give larger gifts. Those gifts fuel the philanthropic missions of charities across the country and have a direct impact on Canada’s communities. The charitable tax designation and the tax credit are a commitment of the people and government to philanthropy and our communities. To drastically change those symbols—to eliminate charitable tax status and giving incentives—is to end that commitment.

The charitable sector is a vital element of Canada’s economy. The sector employs two million Canadians, contributing 10.5% of our labour force and 8.1% of GDP, according to the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations, with more than $100 billion in annual revenue and more than that amount in net assets.

For the second time in three years, the AFP Foundation for Philanthropy – Canada and Ipsos-Reed surveyed a wide range of Canadians about their views about philanthropy, giving, volunteerism and charity in the What Canadian Donors Want Survey. There were many positive findings.

More than three quarters (77%) of Canadians agree that that charities play an important role in society to address needs not being met by the government or the private sector, and confidence in the charitable sector is significantly higher than that for the private and public sector (75% versus 63% and 49%, respectively).

In addition, Canadians are very supportive of charity, with 70% having made a financial donation to a charity over the past 12 months. Most donors are very generous: 44% support 2-3 causes, 21% give to 4-5 causes and 16% support 6 or more causes. Just 20% support only one charity.

But there are signs for concern. The main reason that respondents cite for not making a gift to a charity is not being able to afford it. In addition, almost 10% said they simply do not donate to charity. Furthermore, while the number of donors giving larger gifts increased, the percentage of donors who gave small amounts decreased. This is a trend that Statistics Canada is seeing as well—giving increasing overall but only because of larger gifts made by fewer people.

None of these trends indicate a huge shift in giving—yet. But, referencing one of Coyne’s analogies, they indicate that our country’s charitable giving is teetering atop a pinhead with little margin for error. To recommend eliminating the tax credit entirely is untenable, even more so now when nonprofits are still rebuilding following the recession at a time when we have not seen any sustained increase in giving levels over the past few years.

The charitable tax designation and the tax credit do not define the nonproft sector. The defining characteristic of the sector is what we achieve—impact in communities. The tax credit enhances that impact by encouraging and sustaining the culture of giving in our country. We should be investing more in the tax credit and encouraging additional philanthropy, not eliminating it.

AFP recommends that the government increase tax incentives for charitable giving. In our 2014 Prebudget Consultations Brief, AFP has urged the government to implement a stretch credit that would apply to donated amounts above $200 that exceed a donor’s previous highest giving level and an exemption from capital gains tax to charitable gifts of private company shares, appreciated land and real estate.

The charitable tax designation and the tax credit are effective and proven to work. But most importantly, they are vital symbols of the tradition of philanthropy in Canada. They are part of our culture. They are a rare example of government coming together with the people to invest in a better future for all. And we firmly believe that you cannot eliminate the charitable tax designation and the tax credit without losing something very vital in this country.

Posted by & filed under Case Study, Leadership/Management, Major/Planned Gifts, Marketing/Communications, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Karen Willson, CFRE, Senior VP & Partner, KCI (Ketchum Canada Inc.) 

Heather Hurst, President & CEO, Humber River Hospital Foundation

Yes, this was the situation for Humber River Hospital, when the Campaign started in 2011. Heather and I have been ‘joined at the hip’ to create the winning strategy and have been continually adapting our planning as the Campaign progress.

Due to the magnitude of the new hospital initiative, the private sector goal was pre-established as $225 Million. At KCI, we are aware that Hospital Foundations are being put in the challenging position of having to strive for larger and larger goals based on project costs, rather than on  their own readiness in relation to such factors as strength of their prospect base, availability of volunteers, clarity of case, etc. This intensifies the pressure between the Hospitals and their Foundations. The Hospitals require the flow of funds at certain dates, yet the Foundations’ are dependent on the ability of their volunteers to reach out to philanthropists and, the decision-making process of their donors. KCI is seeing this as a common trend in the Hospital sector (see Philanthropic Trends for more information).

              photo credit: Rusty Russ via photopin cc

Due to the strength of the Case i.e.: 1) the first hospital to be built in Ontario in 25 years; 2) the level of technology that would be incorporated to improve healthcare; and 3) the attention on the patient experience, with the support of my Foundation Board – we rose to this challenge. Karen and I knew we were working with a team of committed volunteer leaders, had secured a $10 Million lead gift and had an exciting case. The new hospital would definitely be ‘revolutionizing healthcare’ in this Province.

We created a traditional gift range chart with a lead gift of $50 Million, built our Top 100 prospect list, recruited our volunteers and marched forward with a sense of enthusiasm and optimism.

A new donor stepped up to support his physician and was so thrilled that the new hospital would be putting Humber River on the map that he joined our campaign cabinet. The Italian community is coming together with group gifts that they hope will inspire others to give. Hospital front-line staff have come forward to donate because they know they will be making a difference to patient care… in fact Environmental Services at all three sites have a 100% donation record!

Our team of Foundation staff is 20 strong. We have divided the Campaign activity into a number of pillars (Catchment Area, Downtown Core, Family Campaign, etc.) and have aligned our team members (both staff and volunteers) to these particular areas. Our goal in aligning staff in this manner is to make sure that the team not only feels a sense of accomplishment but, has fun along the way.

Advice to our colleagues in leading campaigns where a goal is pre-determined is as follows:

  • Set the course of action with the Hospital Leadership and Hospital Board being actively involved
  • Do not assume that the Hospital’s Leadership understands how the fundraising process works….educate, educate and educate
  • Set up regular communications lines between the Hospital and Foundation. We hold quarterly meetings with the Chair of the Hospital Board, Hospital CEO and Chair of Foundation Board (with both of us)
  • Be sympathetic and understanding of the pressures of Hospital leadership as they work to complete this project ‘on budget and on time’.

We are now closing in on $70 Million and have extensive call activity in the pipeline.  When the doors open in October 2015, this Foundation will have taken every step to help the hospital in securing the $225 Million needed.

We will keep you posted on our progress!

KWAs Senior Vice President at KCI, Karen Willson provides strategic direction and project supervision to her clients. This high level of professionalism and expertise was evident in her supervision of the University of Waterloo’s $260 million capital campaign, which exceeded its goal by $353 million. Karen recently worked with Habitat for Humanity Canada, and is currently providing counsel to Humber River Hospital, Women’s College Hospital, Camp Oochigeas and the Elizabeth Fry Society.

HHHeather Hurst has been in the nonprofit sector for 25 years. Heather is now the President and CEO of the Humber River Hospital Foundation and is responsible for the planning and execution of the $225M Capital Campaign for HRH’s new digital hospital. Prior to joining HRH in 2011, Heather was the President and CEO for 7 years at West Park Healthcare Centre and Vice-President of Development and Campaign Director at St. Michaels Hospital Foundation for over 6 years.

 

Posted by & filed under Congress, Major/Planned Gifts, Marketing/Communications, Speakers, Stewardship/Donor Relations.

Rory Green – Associate Director, Advancement, Faculty of Applied Science 

Simon Fraser University

A good conversation with a donor has almost nothing to do with what you say.

What matters most is how you listen.

photo credit: niclindh

I have been on countless donor meetings, accompanied by an eager major gifts officer who has so much to say about their organization – they pitch all areas of their non-profit’s mission at lightning speed, and leave the donor a bit dizzy – and quite often completely disinterested.

I want to let you in on a secret: major gifts isn’t about being able to make a great pitch, it’s about asking great questions and listening really well.

Major gifts officers need to be able to have great conversations with donors. Conversations about hopes, values and beliefs. The key to taking a conversation to a more meaningful level is to build likability, rapport and trust. As fundraisers, we need to be experts at creating rapport – and creating it quickly. Here are some ways you can listen better – that have been proven to build trust fast.

Match Tone: Listen to the tone and speed of the donor’s voice. Do your best to, naturally, match them in tempo, volume and pitch. I’m not telling you to do a fake accent, or impression of them – just be aware of the sound and cadence of their voice and make subtle adjustments.

Affirm and Acknowledge: We need verbal and non-verbal cues we are being heard. Small nods, and “mmhmms” give us permission to continue sharing. Often as we are listening to our donor, our mind begins to race ahead to what we want to say next. Don’t do that! Stay in the moment and focus on hearing what is being said.

Smile: Early on in my major gifts career, I realized I had an awful listening face. When someone is talking to me, I can scrunch my brow – and almost scowl. I look angry, even when I’m not! So, as Tyra Banks wold say, I’ve worked a lot on “smiling with my eyes”. Try asking for feedback on your listening face from family and friends, and when you’re trying to build rapport be sure to smile!

Mirror Body Language: Again, this should be done subtly – but pay attention to how the person you are speaking to is positioned. Are they leaning forward? Back? How is their posture? Mirroring body language puts the person you are talking to at ease, and helps them to feel relaxed.

Synchronize Breath: This is an odd tip, but there is a good amount of research behind this. Try to match the breathing of the person you are having a conversation with, it creates a strong subconscious sense of commonality.

These tricks sound basic, but they are incredibly effective. Try it out yourself. Spend as much time learning about how to be a good listener as you spend learning about your mission and programs.

Want to learn more? Or better yet – have the chance to practice these tips and get live feedback? Come to Congress this November and check out my workshop “Meaningful Conversations (That Raise More Money)”.

Happy Listening!

 

Rory Green has been in the philanthropic sector for over eight years and is currently the Associate Director, Advancement for the Faculty of Applied Science at Simon Fraser University. Rory has also worked in major and corporate giving at BCIT and the Canadian Cancer Society. In her spare time Rory is the founder and editor of Fundraiser Grrl, the fundraising community’s go-to source for comic relief . She will be presenting at Congress 2014 in Toronto.

 

Posted by & filed under Advocacy, Announcement.

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Canada’s new Anti-Spam Legislation, which came into force on July 1, applies to commercial electronic messages that are either sent from, or accessed on, a computer system in Canada. AFP urges you to contact members of Parliament and Senators to exempt electronic communications sent by, or on behalf of, registered charities, or at least provide clear and consistent interpretations for registered charities. To help in these efforts, we’ve armed you with talking points.

  • Thank you for taking the time to meet with me. As a constituent and as a member of the Association of  Fundraising Professionals (AFP), I urge you to instruct Industry Canada and the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to either (A) exempt electronic communications sent by, or on behalf of, registered charities from the proposed regulations’ consent requirements of Canada’s Anti-Spam Legislation (CASL); or (B) provide clear and consistent interpretations of CASL to Canada’s registered charities.
  • To give you some background, AFP has inspired global change and supported charitable efforts that generated over $1 trillion since 1960. AFP’s nearly 32,000 individual and organizational members raise over $100 billion annually for charities around the world, equivalent to one-third of all charitable giving in North America. In Canada, AFP’s over 3,500 members in 20 chapters work for more than 1,800 charities across the country and raise billions of dollars annually.
  • The overall impact of Canada’s charitable sector on our economy is immense. The sector employs two million Canadians, contributing 10.5 percent of our labour force and 8.1% percent of GDP, according to the National Survey of Nonprofit and Voluntary Organizations.
  • As an employee of [Provide a brief overview of your organization and its impact on Canada’s communities].
  • In 2013, AFP urged Industry Canada to exempt electronic communications sent by, or on behalf of, registered charities from the proposed regulations’ consent requirements. Registered charities did not receive that exemption when the law came into force on July 1, 2014, but they are exempt from the regulation of CASL’s provisions for messages sent for the “primary purpose” of raising funds.
  • However, this situation has proven extremely confusing already to charities. Even with the recent FAQ’s published by CRTC, overall definitions and application are still unclear, especially around the ideas of “primary purpose” and “raising funds.”
  • Canada’s charities have utilized electronic communications to bolster their fundraising, outreach and missions in a very cost-effective manner. These efforts also can be more effective and less expensive in reaching potential donors compared to older, more traditional methods of fundraising.
  • Without much-needed clarification and consistent interpretations of “primary purpose” and “raising funds” the uncertainty around CASL has caused confusion for charities which could reduce the cost-effectiveness of the charities’ electronic messages and increase administrative burdens. Charities want to focus as much as possible on their good works and philanthropic missions, and this complicated piece of legislation, which affects all charities regardless of their size, is raising concerns throughout the sector.
  • The easiest means of avoiding confusion around CASL is to exempt electronic communications sent by, or on behalf of, registered charities from the proposed regulations’ consent requirements. Without that exemption, it is imperative that Industry Canada and the CRTC provide clear, yet detailed interpretations of “primary purpose” and “fundraising” in CASL to registered charities as soon as possible.

Download the Talking Points (PDF)

 

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

Toronto Exceptional Achievement Award (2)

Jim Allen, ACFRE and Susan Storey, CFRE received the Exceptional Achievement Award on behalf of AFP Greater Toronto Chapter
July 2014, Niagara-on-the-Lake

Congratulations! 

In 2013, the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter met the Every Member Campaign Goal, achieved 100% Board participation, increased Alpha Society giving, increased member participation and increased overall giving. The chapter can now apply for an additional 5% of the Every Member Campaign money raised to help the geographic area with initiatives that the Foundation funds like scholarships, education, and more! Thank you to everyone who contributed!