The AFP Greater Toronto Chapter is a recognized leader in promoting philanthropy and providing education, training and best practices for those in the fundraising profession. With more than 1200 members, the Greater Toronto Chapter is the largest of the more than 240 AFP chapters throughout the world.

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Posted

Term: Minimum one year

Start Date: April 1, 2021

Location: Toronto

Responsible to: Executive Director and HR Committee Chair

The AFP Greater Toronto Chapter is a recognized leader in promoting philanthropy and providing education, training and best practices for those in the fundraising profession. With more than 1200 members, the Greater Toronto Chapter is the largest of the more than 240 AFP chapters throughout the world.

We are seeking a human resources professional to join our HR Committee in supporting the largest AFP chapter in the world. This is a great volunteer opportunity for a driven individual to work collaboratively, provide strategic advice and guidance, and share best practices to the Chapter Executive Director, Board and members.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Collaborate with the Executive Director and HR Committee to advise and counsel on all HR related matters that impact the AFP GTC team and members.
  • Provide strategic direction on employee recruitment, retention and separation to the Executive Director.
  • On-going coaching through the annual Performance Management Review (PMR) process and objective setting.
  • Reviewing existing HR policies and suggest changes where necessary.
  • Opportunity to develop and facilitate educational sessions for members.
  • Available for monthly committee meetings (max. one hour) and ad-hoc projects.

QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Post-secondary education in Human Resources or an equivalent combination of education and experience is required.
  • Minimum of three (3) years of related Human Resources experience.
  • Certified Human Resources Leader (CHRL) designation is an asset.
  • Knowledgeable on employee recruitment, selection and separation, employee and/or labour relations, policy and procedure development, performance management, and compensation and reporting.
  • Comprehensive knowledge of human resources and health and safety principles and applicable legal and regulatory guidelines is required, including but not limited to the Employment Standards Act (ESA), Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA), Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), Human Rights Code (HRC), Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA), and other applicable regulations.
  • Experience in or working with non-profit organizations.
  • Maintain a high level of confidentiality and exercise discretion.

Interested candidates please forward your cover letter and resume to Penny Connors at pconnors@afptoronto.org

Posted

March 12, 2021

Toronto

 

NEW JOB POSTING POLICY EFFECTIVE JUNE 1, 2021

 

After extensive discussions and thorough research, the AFP-GTC Board has decided to implement a policy requiring all job postings to include salary ranges. The new policy roll-out will be supported by necessary educational resources.

As of June 1, 2021, all organizations posting jobs on our site must include a salary range for the advertised role. The AFP-GTC believes in promoting and supporting fairness and transparency as part of the Chapter’s IDEA mandate, and is committed to doing its part in eradicating procedures and processes that advance systemic discrimination during the hiring process.

We acknowledge that this new Job Posting Policy is only a small part that lends to more transparency in the hiring process, but it is a necessary one. Job candidates need to know and trust that they will not be discriminated against even before getting to the interview stage.

The AFP-GTC is planning a 3-part education series to support our members over the next several weeks, as we transition to more wage transparency and our policy on listing salary ranges. This series will address the “WHY?” and the “HOW?”.

  • WHY: Why it is important to take these steps as a sector; why it impacts diversity and inclusion as a whole, and why it is important to the larger goal of equity, anti-racism, and decreasing the wage gap.
  • HOW: The HOWs of implementing this policy in small to large and in new or old organizations. We also hope to provide mentors willing to share their time and expertise with organizations that are looking to make this change but need some support to do so.

Collectively, these sessions will provide thoughtful guidance to our member organizations on how to remove systemic barriers in the sector through their hiring processes.

The AFP-GTC also wishes to thank our member organizations currently providing salary ranges on our job board and encourage them to continue their efforts toward ending discriminatory recruitment practices.

Should you have any question regarding this new Job Posting Policy, please contact us at: info@afptoronto.org.

[END]

Posted

Originally published on WordPress by Debra Thompson.

Posted December 3, 2020 by AFP Toronto

Last we left this story, in January 2019, I wrote about the role of pivoting and why it was so important to my career change. I shared my very first blog post and applied current state to my experience with kickboxing, where being able to pivot and not get punched was even more important. Proof of this post can be found here: https://taximom03.wordpress.com/2019/01/30/pivot-pivot-pivot/

Now, along with uncertain, unprecedented, social distancing, lockdown, speaking moistly, and trying times, the word pivot has become one of the words we will forever associate with the COVID-19 pandemic. None of us could have predicted what 2020 would be like and what we’re still living with now. I had no idea that a word I used to describe my story in 2019 would become an overused buzzword in 2020. I’d like to reconsider using the urban dictionary version, also popularized by a meme from the TV show Friends, in reference to moving, defined as “the precise way to bring a couch up a flight of stairs.”

As I embark on the next phase of my career journey into the fundraising world, it all feels the same, but different – and we do indeed need to pivot. Amy Davies, in her book, A Spark in the Dark, reminds us that we are all in a reorg world. She wonders, “how do you build a rewarding and meaningful career in an ever-changing landscape?” I doubt when she wrote this book, she was thinking the ever-changing landscape would be a pandemic! Yet her lessons apply, and I know many are updating their plan and career path as they deal with the changes this pandemic has brought. Everyone is dealing with something and doing their best as we rise to defeat this pandemic, despite the real fact this will have an effect on how we work and live for many years to come.

Personally, admittedly, like everyone at the moment, my mental health has taken a toll, and it is strange times indeed.

I signed up to attend my third AFP (Association of Fundraising Professionals) Greater Toronto Chapter Congress, held on November 23-25, 2020. In deciding to attend a virtual fundraising industry conference, I challenged myself to step out of my pandemic funk and take a more deliberate approach. Cringe if you will, but I pivoted, for just a moment. Appropriately called NOT Congress – the conference was billed as something new, different, and evolving! I signed up right away during the “early bird” registration and despite being overwhelmed with all things virtual, I was excited to attend again and I was confident AFP could pull it off.

As many of my friends, family, and colleagues have been doing, I have attended my share of virtual events this year. I’ve lost count of the number of virtual events I signed up for and attended, or those I didn’t attend, with well-intentioned plans of “watching the recording” later, which I rarely did. At one point, I stopped signing up and attending events because I was clearly “zoom-fatigued” – a self-diagnosis, but one that seems to be common during these times of pandemic life.

I was also involved in producing three virtual events this year! All three were delivered to large audiences, with multiple speakers, engaged stakeholders, and high expectations from attendees. My “clipboard Deb” event mindset kicked-in and I was truly building the plane while flying it. I learned what it took to run a successful virtual event reliant not just on people and processes, but on technology and the internet! Having been behind the scenes for these events and knowing the next level team effort required to pull them off, I decided that I would be respectful of my fellow AFP colleagues. I would show up and be engaged and attentive. They were working hard to curate an event with top quality content showcasing the work of industry colleagues, and I owed it to them and myself to show up.

In 2018, I attended my very first Congress as a new fundraiser. Pre-conference prep for an in-person event involved determining accommodations, transportation, what to wear as well as planning the sessions I would attend. This time, I had two years of fundraising experience behind me, with lots to learn and a new lens and perspective. I had no commute and no wardrobe decisions to make. The #NotCongress team made my pre-planning easy and shipped a fantastic virtual swag bag to my home which included useful swag and an event notebook – a handy tool to help me plan my day and choose my sessions. I blocked my calendar and told family in my household that I was “attending an event” and that I’d be in my home office for most of the three days. I connected with other colleagues and friends in the sector to find out who would be there.

AFP rose to the task of creating an inspiring digital event in the era of “this is how we’ve always done it!” and it was a resounding success! This year, we’ve been asked to confront our privilege, and acknowledge our differences and collective experiences. AFP succeeded in helping 1,400 fundraisers from across Canada and around the world find our truth – and they did so in a way that was just right.

This event was incredible! It was well-organized and filled with thought provoking sessions, main plenary “breaks”, and a few fun events including a cooking class, bingo, and trivia. There were speed networking opportunities in breakout rooms where we were mentored and advised by members of the AFP-GTC Board of Directors. There were chances to network and laugh and chat. The speakers were authentic and genuine, and I was once again inspired by their sessions. I had virtual breakfasts and coffee with a few fundraising friends, and often “sat” with them as we participated in the same session by engaging on social media. I networked with new people via the attendee section of the platform. Many of the presenters used the chat feature to engage participants, and I often found I was in the same session as friends. All virtual, of course. During every session I was in awe of the dedication, wisdom, and passion of these fellow fundraisers.

The event started with a fantastic open plenary with Yassmin Abdel-Magied. We were challenged to consider our own unconscious bias, the power of change, and to create human connection. During a session about death, grief, and legacy giving, I had a good cry when I was gently reminded why I joined this sector in the first place. I was in awe as the panelists in “Closing the Leadership Gap: A Conversation on Women in Fundraising” shared their truth in an authentic and transparent discussion. I considered my own truth and challenged my inherent biases in the world of inclusivity. On the last day, I attended back-to-back sessions delivered by two of my favourite fundraisers, and heard final words in the form of poetry from Sarah Kay in the closing plenary. There were prizes for engagement and, though I didn’t win a prize, I was proud to place in the Top Five.

I left the event energized and hopeful for the future of our profession because of the support and help I received from our community of fundraisers. I’m thankful for the dedication of the AFP team, the speakers, and most of all to the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter for their bravery in deciding to go forward with this event. I’m grateful for the wonderful friends and mentors I have met in the sector, and for the ones I met this week.

If you’ve attended a virtual conference recently, you’ll know that feeling you get when you realize it’s over – instead of hugging your friends, you’re alone in your home office as you click “leave meeting.” I don’t like that feeling but it will have to do for now because I’m excited about the growth and learning I experienced. I didn’t get to hug my friends, raise a glass, or break bread this year, and hope that we all get to see each in person next year. Either way, I will continue to use the word ‘pivot’ in my vernacular, and I remain energized about the possibilities ahead.