Posted by & filed under Uncategorized.

That’s china, with a lower case “c” as in a set of fancy, old plates, not the country. Allow me to explain, this morning on my commute to work, I read yet another article about how Millennials are eschewing their parents’ Royal Doulton figurines and heirloom china in favour of minimalist lifestyles. Apparently this applies even to the lucky few who are home owners. The article, like many others that have been written over the last few years, suggests that this is the case because Millennials value experiences more than things (especially Instagrammable experiences).

This is a lesson that we, in the fundraising sector, must take to heart. As fundraisers, it is crucial that we take our cues from the daily habits of our donors outside of the non-profit sector. Newsflash, human behavior does not change drastically simply because someone is giving to a good cause!

As a 30-something year old, who often has to remind others she’s a Gen Y not a Millennial, I can tell you that I have far too often received fundraising appeals that are directed at someone twice my age. Return address labels, greeting cards, key chains…ugh! If I don’t want my family’s tchotchkes, do you think I want yours unnamed but well intentioned non-profit?!

It’s high time for us to start segmenting by age and stage of life when it comes to our mid-level giving strategies. Millennial and Gen Y donors have no interest in freebies. Indeed, receiving these things may make donors under the age of 35 less likely to continue to give to your cause. Subsequently, this will likely cause them to question how you are spending their hard earned donations.

Instead, we must start speaking to them in a way that appeals to them. Why not send them an invitation to experience your cause in a hands on manner? For example, if you work for a health based charity that partakes in research & care, plan an opportunity for donors to do basic health science experiments with some of the young researchers. I assure you from my own experience, not only will your young professional donors relish this opportunity to deepen their understanding of the cause, they will Instagram, Tweet and Facebook about it and create fantastic earned publicity for your cause.

These opportunities exist within many non-profit organizations but are often offered exclusively to major donors who are frankly so saturated with opportunities to don fake scrubs or swing a hammer that they often do not attend or appreciate these events. Reimagining these events could allow you to organically grow young professional ambassadors for your cause. And we all know how much Millennials love anything organic…

Hava Goldberg is a passionate fundraiser and community builder who is currently the Senior Development Officer, Community Engagement at the Sinai Health Foundation. She is a proud alumunus of the University of Guelph and holds a Masters in Non-Profit Management (specializing in Jewish Communal Services) from Spertus College (Chicago). Hava has worked in the non-profit sector for nine years and in fundraising for the last four years. She has been an active volunteer and fundraiser for as long as she can remember.

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

Are you interested in positioning yourself as a thought leader in the fundraising community?

By writing a blog for AFP Greater Toronto Chapter you’ll have the opportunity to share your insights, knowledge and expertise with our members.  AFP offers a great platform and chance to connect with fundraisers.

Tips on Writing a Blog Post:

  1. Make the post useful to the readers – offer tips, advice or insight into an area of your work.
  2. Offer a fresh angle – a point of view you don’t often read online or hear in conversation.
  3. Share a pride in the profession, even when challenging ideas – we are proud to represent fundraisers in Toronto, and we understand your work is complicated (your peers can relate).
  4. Offer practical information that will help readers understand a complicated issue or address similar challenges. This doesn’t need to be a bullet point list of tips, just information or advice that readers can apply to their own understanding.
  5. Provide original, personal, and honest work. This means your post has never before been published anywhere, including your own blog. You are free to post on your own blog within 72 hours of posting on the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter blog.

Your blog should be a minimum length of approximately 450 words, and a maximum of 650 words. All blogs will include your photo, bio and any social media handles (feel free to include your contact info too).  All submissions will be reviewed for approval – please note that promotional blogs cannot be accepted.

We are flexible and open to your ideas on what you would like to blog about.  Please email Sarah at sedwards@afptoronto.org to start the conversation.

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

The AFP Fundamentals of Fundraising Course is composed of seven modules that have been designed by experienced fundraising professionals to meet the real-world needs and challenges nonprofit organizations face every day.This program includes case studies and projects for groups and individuals, making the learning experience both substantive and enjoyable.

This intensive program offers a complete overview of the development function, featuring the most current information and techniques. The course will provide an overview of skills, techniques, and program components for individuals with 0 to 4 years of fundraising experience.  READ MORE

 

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

Are you interested in joining a CFRE Review Course and or a Study Group?  Join us for the 2-day CFRE Review Course (open to AFP members and non-members) or 9-week CFRE Study Group (AFP Members only) to help you prepare to take the exam.

We will organize the Review Course and Study Group based on demand, setting the dates and venue to accommodate the most number of people possible.

If you are interested in attending, please let us know through this quick form (we will only be able to offer the course if we receive enough interest).  Please indicate your interest and preferences.

If you have any questions please contact info@afptoronto.org

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Next Generation Philanthropy, Uncategorized.

The Association of Fundraising Professionals Greater Toronto Chapter is proud to announce Samantha Banks, Director of Operations and Development at The House as the 2016 New Fundraising Professional Award recipient.

Samantha Banks
Director of Operations and Development
The House

Samantha is an enthusiastic and inspiring fundraiser with a deep commitment to the fundraising profession.  As she says, “There are so many incredible professionals who have dedicated their lives to the philanthropic sector.  It is a tremendous honour to be recognized as one of them.”

After only two years working at The House, Samantha has tremendously helped to raise the profile of the organization. She has significantly increased young adult programming and engagement and raised corporate sponsorship three-fold for their marquee event JEDx. Samantha has added a new level of flair and creativity while keeping true to the mission and vision of the charity.

In addition to her impressive day job at The House, Samantha is known for her tireless commitment to improving the non-profit sector through her volunteer work.  She has made vital contributions to AFP Greater Toronto Chapter, as well as Sinai Health Foundation, Toronto Public Library Foundation, and Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation.   As a Contemporary Dance Major (BFA) at Concordia University, she was President of Hillel Concordia, Hillel Montreal and the Canadian Federation of Jewish Students.

Samantha is passionate about supporting networking events and conferences that bring young professionals together and build community.   As Chair, Next Gen Philanthropy Advisory Committee, she was instrumental in planning the AFP Next Gen Philanthropy Conference (March 2014), as part of the Diversity to Inclusion Series – a groundbreaking initiative organized by the AFP Foundation for Philanthropy – Canada. This conference brought together philanthropists, community leaders, fundraisers and volunteers in an effort to start a conversation about how charities are working with the next generation of philanthropists in Ontario.

She has demonstrated her dedication to the fundraising profession by being an active member of the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter’s Marketing, Membership & Communications Committee (present), and on AFP Ottawa Chapter’s Board of Directors.  Samantha has also shared her expertise by presenting at Congress (2014) and Fundraising Day Ottawa (2013), and serving as a moderator at the International Conference (2014).

Samantha says, “I consider myself fortunate to get the chance to be in the same room as those who have carved the path of what philanthropy looks like today and those who are shaping what it will look like tomorrow.”   She is now recognized as one of the top young professionals who will help shape the future of the fundraising profession in Toronto.  Samantha is a graduate of the Humber Fundraising and Volunteer Management Program, and plans to go for her CFRE in 2016/2017.

When asked what she values most about fundraising, she answered: “The people. The characters who walk through the door just wanting to give. The passionate personalities of the volunteers on the ground. The loyal attendees who support rain or shine. The fearless people who have made this industry their career.”  Samantha is an inspiration with an incredible career ahead of her.    As Samantha always says, “I will continue to change lives until the day people stop changing mine.”

Background

Established in 2001, the AFP Greater Toronto Chapter New Fundraising Professional Award recognizes a full-time fundraising professional who has displayed exceptional talent and demonstrated outstanding achievement early in his/her career. The recipient has between two and five years of experience in fundraising and is selected through submissions from Chapter members. The award encompasses career achievements, long and short term career objectives, personal volunteer service and a commitment to the profession.

About AFP

AFP Greater Toronto Chapter is a recognized leader in promoting philanthropy and providing education, training and best practices for those in the fundraising profession. With more than 1200 members, the Greater Toronto Chapter is the largest of the more than 244 AFP chapters throughout the world.

Contact

Cynthia Quigley
Director, AFP Greater Toronto Chapter
Tel: 416-941-9212
Email: cquigley@afptoronto.org

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Uncategorized.

When two friends and former clients simultaneously moved from one employer (which I will call Alpha) to a new employer (which I will call Beta), they already knew a lot about the new employer’s donors and prospects, because of their experience at Alpha. And they had collaborated on many major donor solicitations.

This presented an ethical dilemma for them. Standard No. 18 in the AFP’s Code of Ethics says “Members shall adhere to the principle that all donor and prospect information created by, or on behalf of,

an organization or a client is the property of that organization or client.”

The question put to me was: “How do we manage knowledge of donors when crossing to another organization? How do you ‘pretend’ to not know what you know?”

Here’s what I said (edited for confidentiality and length.)

That’s a tricky question. You know what you know.

We face this as consultants: we must studiously avoid porting any “proprietary” information from one client to another that might “improve” the result for the lower-performing charity. When we must, we can say “We can’t comment on that.” It works because we’re not making final solicitation decisions.

This will be harder for you.

The AFP principle is clear, but doesn’t speak to how you manage the accumulated knowledge you have. Always, the spirit of your effort is key, rather than the letter of a policy. But I propose these boundaries.

  • You can never report outside of Alpha what any Alpha donor has done or even that they are Alpha donors, unless that information is public.
  • You cannot approach specific Alpha donors with news of your move UNLESS you had relationships prior to joining Alpha.
  • You and your former/current colleague should never discuss the history of Alpha donors, even privately. That information is no longer yours.
  • You cannot comment to any Beta donor about his/her giving history at Alpha UNLESS the donor raises it.
  • Even if it wanted to, Alpha cannot give you a dispensation to build on its information for selected donors – in the end, it’s not their information.
  • You cannot create a prospect list for Beta based on donors you met through Alpha. Some other route to identifying and qualifying those prospects must be followed.
  • Because prospect identification and solicitation is part of your job, you must be honest with yourself about the prospect’s signs of interest/ affinity for the cause, and other parameters that would put someone new on the radar for your new employer, or elevate their priority. Involving others with no history of your former employer will help.
  • Ideally a legitimate ask amount will emerge organically through prospect identification, considering affinity, history and estimated capacity of the donor. Jacking up proposed ask amounts for certain Beta prospects based on their giving to Alpha violates confidentiality. It also mistakenly assumes that a donor weights each case the same way, when they certainly do not. Because your knowledge will undoubtedly be a factor in your own inner dialogue, involving other staff or even volunteers in setting ask amounts can protect you somewhat.
  • Once a prospect is legitimately identified for your new employer, and you know, for example, that the prospect likes breakfast meetings, it’s stupid to ignore that knowledge. It’s also stupid to flag your knowledge: keeping your own counsel is smart.

The passage of time will help. If a year from now you’ve diligently qualified a bunch of people who happen also to be Alpha donors, so be it. But if your first 10 calls are on Alpha donors not already known to Beta, you have a problem.

Exercise restraint. Do the work that would yield prospects. Create the profiles so you have a paper trail. Be scrupulous about what you talk about. Soon there will be no issue.

This is an interesting challenge. Few people likely care as much as you will – I always liked that about you.

So, what would you say? We know what and who we know. How do we ethically steward that information?

For more on Article 18 of the Ethics Code click here.

Larry Matthews

Larry Matthews, CFRE, is Vice-President of KMA Consultants Inc., which specializes in campaigns and pre-campaign studies, annual fund reviews, and major gift planning and coaching. Larry has been a fundraiser since 1983 and a consultant since 1995, with specialized expertise in case development, research among donors, and donor communications of all kinds. He writes an occasional blog which can be found at http://www.kmaconsultants.ca/  email to: lmatthews@kmaconsultants.ca

 

Posted by & filed under Announcement, Uncategorized.

Tony Elischer has died. It’s hard to believe that someone who lived life so fully, who bounded into a room, who was perpetually enthusiastic, upbeat and loved our profession – is gone.

I first attended the International Workshop on Fundraising Management, now the International Fundraising Congress, in the early 1990s. There I was introduced to a remarkable group of British fundraisers – George Smith, Ken Burnett, Margaret Bennett, Richard Radcliffe, Bernard Ross, Stephen Pidgeon and others. But above all, there was Tony Elischer.

When Allan Arlett and I founded the Toronto Fundraising Congress in 1995, we brought some of these fine fundraisers over. Tony first came in 1997. All told, Tony appeared at 11 AFP Greater Toronto Chapter Congresses. After his successes here, we introduced Tony to the AFP International Conference on Fundraising, where he presented multiple times.

What did Tony talk about? Well, it’s best summed up with the word ‘innovation’. He wanted to make the world a better place. He challenged us to think and do things differently to make that happen – in our work, for our causes and for ourselves.

Tony raised our game. His enthusiasm and networking led to Canadians taking their place on the international fundraising stage too. He encouraged fundraisers in the United States, Australia, New Zealand, Europe, India, Africa and beyond. A consummate networker, Tony connected so many of us and improved our profession globally.

Tony loved conferences, and most of all he loved conference plenaries. He did seven in Toronto, including the groundbreaking and inspirational Fundraising Theatre in 2012. It’s still being talked about. Tony was then thrilled to take this concept to the AFP International Conference on Fundraising in San Antonio for the Kaleidoscope in Philanthropy plenary in 2014.

We’re going to miss you Tony. Big time. Here in Toronto, throughout Canada and around the world.

I don’t know if there’s a conference in heaven. But if there is, Tony Elischer will be asking God if he can do the plenary. And if God is smart, he’ll say yes!

Steve Thomas, CFRE

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Posted by & filed under Career Development, Next Generation Philanthropy.

This post is a primer for major gift fundraisers who find themselves doing corporate fundraising as part of their daily job. That said, I think this will also be useful to the full service fundraiser as well as the Executive Director who is occasionally asked to join in cause marketing style meetings.

Let’s take a look at the differences between major individual giving and corporate fundraising (often erroneously referred to a corporate philanthropy). I have done both types of giving and am approached regularly by people asking to help their boards, CEOs and staff understand the difference between the two types fundraising, so let’s dive in!

Fundraising: Individual vs Corporate Giving

Let’s start with the difference in motivation between the two camps. I will be speaking in general terms here but it’s important to note that the only rule of thumb is that…there are no rules of thumb! There are always exceptions to the rules but by and large, my experience is that the following is true 90% of the time:

Motivations of the Major Donor

Individuals typically measure the impact of their gift by, well, impact. If an individual lost a relative to an illness and they want to make a donation then they look for social return on their investment. Perhaps the gift is therapeutic, or to cure a disease, or provide a social outcome that they believe in. You the fundraiser are their partner in helping them realize a vision of change within their community or area of interest.

Motivations of the Corporate “Donor”

Some individuals will indeed make gifts through their companies or through their corporate foundations but I would argue that these are not corporate gifts, but individual gifts. You steward these gifts as individuals, ask an individual and report back to an individual. So let’s leave that type of giving aside and focus on the cause-marketing umbrella, at its heart a marketing spend.

Companies exist to make a profit and shareholders invest in companies for a return on that investment. When a company engages a charity, it is seldom framed in this context overtly by the prospect but branding, community engagement, product placement and employee engagement are all desirable to the corporation because they lead to a healthier bottom line in some way. This comes in all shapes and sizes and could be through more engaged staff, brand recognition, product sales or an increase in market share or overall market size.

Pretty simple stuff and nothing groundbreaking here, I know. The impact that this not so subtle difference has on how someone approaches a prospect is tremendous.

Individual vs Corporate Prospects

When I am seeking a major gift, I want to speak to a high net worth individual (and the definition of high net worth depends on my gift goals). I research who they have given to, their net worth, their salary and which influencers I am connected to who can make the introduction. When I talk to them, I ask them about their giving interests and talk about how my projects can help them achieve their philanthropic goals. I am asking them to give me their own personal money and to trust that I will solve a social problem for/with them.

I would never, ever, lead with where I can put their name, how many e-mail addresses I can collect for them, how many free gala passes they will get and how many branded tweets I will send out for them. The idea of approaching a major donor this way is totally ludicrous but we often approach corporate prospects through a major gift lens.

When I am looking to sell sponsorship, run a point of purchase campaign or product placement opportunities I look for people in the marketing, business development, brand and communications departments. When I want to build an employee engagement campaign or community outreach strategy I look for HR people or CSR staff.

In other words, I am asking people to invest their company’s money, not their own. I talk to them about their business goals and how I can help them be more profitable but also how I can help that particular professional meet the goals that they are being measured on (product sales, market share etc.). The only time I am asked about the impact my charity is having on the world in these types of meetings is when it is in the context of their market research. That is, their key demographic (customer, employee, investor etc.) cares about a particular cause and so the company wants to be seen supporting that cause. Just like I would never tell the individual giver about branding opportunities, I would never ask a Brand Director for them to give me a cheque to help my program user for nothing more than the positive impact it will have on society.

How to Know When to Talk Gift vs Investment

You should expect to shift into philanthropy mode when the following happens:

  • You meet in a prospect’s home with their family (though many major donors meet in their offices as well)
  • They share deep personal stories with you
  • When you tell stories about the people/animals/environment that you help they ask to hear more
  • They ask about the social impact of their donation and never move on to how you can help their company

You should shift into marketing mode when the following happens:

  • You are meeting with someone who has any of the following in their title: brand, communications, human resources, CSR (though CSR folks often act like grant givers so this one could go either way!) or who is from a third party marketing or communications company representing a prospect
  • They ask you about your mission and them immediately start to ask you about your database, events, stakeholders, market research etc.
  • They talk about products, market research, proposals and corporate volunteering

The Cause Marketing Meeting Roadmap

My advice to people who are heading in to talk about sponsorship, cause marketing or corporate fundraising in general is to go to the meeting empty handed! Don’t bring a proposal, don’t bring a sponsorship package, don’t bring a leave behind and definitely do NOT bring your case for support!

Go to the meeting with the sole purpose of asking questions and getting the second meeting to present a customized proposal to the decision makers if you and the prospect agree that there could be a fit.

When you go to a meeting, be prepared to answer questions about sponsorship opportunities, volunteer opportunities, key events, the size of your database, who your brand appeals to (if you’ve done the market research, otherwise…don’t guess) and whether or not you have the capacity to deliver on their campaign ideas.When the opportunity comes for you to speak, be sure to end every sentence with a question mark. The following is a good starting point to ask a corporate prospect:

  1. Who is your target audience?
  2. How do you like to engage and market to your customers?
  3. What does your target market value?
  4. What can you tell me about your marketing and sales goals for the coming year?
  5. What would you consider to be the most important elements of a partnership between our two organizations?
  6. The goal of the first meeting is never to close the deal, though it is wonderful when that happens! The goal of the first meeting is to gather information to build a customized proposal and to get the second meeting.

Tracking, Reporting and Measuring Impact

When I report back to major donors, I focus on whether or not we met the mission goals of the project, stayed true to budget and reached the number of people/animals/projects we said we would. I prepare stories and samples of impact, I do site tours and project visits and I bring board members and program users to come to thank the donor and show them how they are making a difference.

When I report back to a corporate entity, I talk about website traffic, product distribution, speaking opportunities, employee volunteer numbers, press pickup and media hits. I create a formal fulfillment package complete with photos, web hits, attendee reports and everything I can to prove that my sponsor got the value I promised them.

If you are a seasoned fundraiser then you already have much of the experience needed to be working with corporate prospects! As you can see by this post, there are some subtleties and differences between the two types of giving and, while the creation of a sponsorship package and valuation requires some technical expertise, you can certainly do well in the first and second meeting by changing your approach slightly based on the principles in this post.

 

ChrisChris Baylis is a fundraising professional with expertise in cause marketing, sponsorship and corporate social responsibility (CSR). Chris has managed both national and local campaigns and is a board member of the Association of Fundraising Professionals in Ottawa.

Chris is also the Founder and Chief Blogger for The Sponsorship Collective and can be found on Twitter @CPBaylis writing about all things cause marketing.

Posted by & filed under Announcement.

The AFP Foundation for Philanthropy – Canada and the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration’s Partnership Project—along with the AFP Ontario, Greater Toronto Chapter and AFP Ontario, Ottawa Chapter—coordinated a series of twelve workshops for fundraising professionals, donors and volunteers to develop a greater understanding of the giving traditions and charitable interests of these communities in Ontario. These are the 12 research papers that resulted from those workshops (in both English and French):

Posted by & filed under Career Development, Inspiration, Leadership/Management.

 

Janice Cunning, ACC, CPCC, Leadership Coach, Life on Purpose

Values represent who you are, what is most important to you, and how you want to express yourself in the world. As fundraisers we are passionate about discovering our donor’s values and helping them express these through their philanthropy. Sometimes we get caught up in our own work and focused on meeting our goals and we forget to create space to explore and connect with our own core values. When we do this we are doing ourselves a huge disservice.

Three positive things happen when you honour your values:

wmi1. You feel motivated to take action

Think about something you need to do that you might have been avoiding. For example, you might have a set of call notes that you need to enter into the database. If this isn’t something you enjoy it can get pushed to the bottom of your list. Your values can help you find the motivation to complete this task authentically. If you value connection, then you can think about entering the notes as a way to deepen the relationship between your organization and the donor. If you value fun, you can make the task into a game by timing yourself and having a reward for beating the clock.

2. You can quiet your gremlins

We all have those voices that keep us stuck in the status quo. It might say you aren’t good enough or convince you that you don’t want to move outside your comfort zone. Truly connecting with your values can help you move forward despite these voices. Perhaps you want to apply for a promotion at work. Your gremlins might ask if you are qualified enough to do that job. They may tell you that a promotion will mean more work and less time for family. Your values are always stronger than the gremlins. If you value purpose then you can approach the decision from that perspective. You can reflect on how this new position will help you have a greater impact on your organization and those it serves.

3. You have a more fulfilling career

Values serve as a compass and point you in the direction of what will be most fulfilling and meaningful to you. This isn’t always easy. If you value honesty then there will be times you need to speak your truth even if it contradicts what your organization is planning to do. You will do this even if you are the lone voice speaking out. If you value stillness there will be times you have to say no people and tasks at work because creating space for yourself is key to your success. When you consciously choose to honour your core values you create a career that truly reflects who you are. And that is the ultimate goal.

So what are your core values? Your values are there inside you and you express them every day. However you may not have articulated them to yourself.

The simplest way to unearth your core values is to explore this question: “What must I have in my life for it to be fulfilling and meaningful?”

This is an exciting question that can be explored in so many ways – in thought, in writing, in pictures, or in conversation. Brainstorm a list of all the possibilities. Make sure you explore fully each aspect of your life. For example you might say I value my career. Explore what values are represented in your work, such as connection, contribution, making a difference, achievement, etc.

Spend a few days creating a list of words and phrases that represent what is most important to you. Use your own words and be creative. Once you have a full list, choose the 5 or 10 that are most important to you.

Now you are ready for the most important part – using your values to guide your choices each and every day. What will you choose to do today?

Janice Cunning is a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach trained by the Coaches Training Institute (CTI) with over 15 years of experience as a fundraising consultant and researcher. Janice was a Senior Consultant at KCI where she provided coaching to leading university prospect research departments with a focus on strategic planning, teamwork, and communication. Janice will be presenting at Fundraising Day 2015 in Toronto. You can follow her on twitter @janicecunning